February calendar

Classical performances in and around Richmond, with selected events elsewhere in Virginia and the Washington area. Program information, provided by presenters, is updated as details become available. Adult ticket prices are listed; senior, student/youth, military, group and other discounts may be offered. Service fees may be added.

Contact presenters or venues for Covid-19 safety protocols.

Feb. 1 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Richard Becker, piano
Becker: “Nine Inventions for the Muses”
works TBA by Ravel, Albéniz, Chopin
poetry readings from Becker’s “Fates,” “On Sunday Afternoons,” “Scylla”

free
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

Feb. 2 (7:30 p.m.)
First Baptist Church, Monument Avenue at Arthur Ashe Boulevard, Richmond
Richmond Symphony Chorus
Valentina Peleggi directing

Dan Forrest: “Good Night, Dear Heart: Requiem for the Living”
other works TBA

$25
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://richmondsymphony.com

Feb. 2 (7:30 p.m.)
Williamsburg Community Chapel, 3899 John Tyler Highway
Williamsburg Symphony Orchestra
Michael Butterman conducting

Michael Abels: “Global Warming”
Xavier Foley: “For Justice and Peace”

Xavier Foley, double-bass
Bottesini: “Gran Duo concertante”
Xavier Foley, double-bass
Eunice Kim, violin

Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor
$60
(757) 229-9857
http://williamsburgsymphony.org

Feb. 2 (7 p.m.)
Feb. 4 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
James Gaffigan conducting

Mozart: “Idomeneo” – ballet music
Schumann: Piano Concerto in A minor

Beatrice Rana, piano
Dvořák: Symphony No. 7 in D minor
$15-$109
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 2 (7:30 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Opera Lafayette
Patrick Dupré-Quigley conducting
Gwendoline Blondeel & Hannah De Priest, sopranos
Sarah Mesko, mezzo-soprano
Patrick Kilbride, tenor
Jonathan Woody, bass-baritone

Pergolesi: “La Servante Maîtresse”
Nick Olcott, stage direction
Pergolesi: “Stabat Mater”
$90-$135
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 2 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Kwamé Ryan conducting

John Luther Adams: “Become Ocean”
Dvořák: Cello Concerto in B minor

Pablo Ferrández, cello
$35-$90
(877) 276-1444
http://strathmore.org

Feb. 3 (7 p.m.)
Holy Comforter Episcopal Church, Monument Avenue at Staples Mill Road, Richmond
Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia:
Cramer String Quartet
James Wilson, cello

“La Vida Notturna”
Boccherini: Guitar Quintet in G major (“Fandango”)
Brian Nabors: “Soul Bop”
Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga: Quartet No. 3 in E flat major
Boccherini: String Quintet in C major (“La musica notturno della strade di Madrid”)
Boccherini: String Quintet in E major – Minuetto

$30
(804) 304-6312
http://cmscva.org

Feb. 3 (8 p.m.)
The Anthem, 901 Wharf St. SW, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
James Gaffigan conducting

Mozart: “Idomeneo” – ballet music
Dvořák: Symphony No. 7 in D minor

$25-$40
(202) 888-0020
http://theanthemdc.com

Feb. 3 (7:30 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
National Philharmonic
Piotr Gajewski conducting

Rachmaninoff: “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini”
Claire Huangci, piano
Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2 in E minor
$19-$99
(877) 276-1444
http://strathmore.org

Feb. 4 (2 p.m.)
Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library, First and Franklin streets
Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia:
Cramer Quartet
Haydn: “The Seven Last Words of Christ” (excerpts)
Jessica Meyer: “Father, Forgive Them”
Caroline Shaw: “Seven”
Haydn: Quartet in D major, Op. 71, No. 2 (“Apponyi”)

free
(804) 646-7223
http://rvalibrary.org/events/gellman-concerts/

Feb. 4 (8 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Richmond Symphony Pops
Chia-Hsuan Lin conducting

“Classic Hollywood Love Songs”
songs TBA from “West Side Story,” “Ben Hur,” “Dr. Zhivago,” “Titanic,” other films

$15-$85
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://richmondsymphony.com

Feb. 4 (8 p.m.)
Feb. 5 (2 p.m.)
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax
Virginia Opera
Adam Turner conducting

Gregory Spears & Greg Pierce: “Fellow Travelers”
Joseph Lattanzi (Hawkins Fuller)
Andres Acosta (Timothy Laughlin)
Katherine Pracht (Mary Johnson)
Katrina Thurman (Miss Lightfoot)
Joshua Jeremiah (Sen. Joseph McCarthy/Estonian Frank/Interrogator)
John Fulton (Sen. Charles Potter/General Arlie/Bartender)
Kaileigh Riess (Lucy)
Kyle White (Tommy McIntyre)
Jeremy Harr (Sen. Potter’s Assistant/Bookseller/Technician/French Priest/Party Guest)
Kevin Newbury, stage director

in English, English captions
$45-$115
(866) 673-7282
http://vaopera.org

Feb. 5 (3 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Anthony McGill, clarinet
Gloria Chien, piano

Telemann: Fantasias for solo clarinet
Jessie Montgomery: “Peace”
Brahms: Clarinet Sonata in F minor, Op. 120, No. 1
Deng Yu-Hsien: “Pining for the Spring Breeze”
(Stephen Hough arrangement)
James Lee III: “Ad Anah?”
Weber: “Grand Duo Concertant”

$35
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

Feb. 5 (5 p.m.)
Virginia Museum of History and Culture, Arthur Ashe Boulevard at Kensington Avenue, Richmond
Richmond Symphony String Ensemble
“History Notes: an Intimate Evening of History & Music”
program TBA

$48
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://richmondsymphony.com

Feb. 5 (7 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Washington Performing Arts Gospel Choirs
Michele Fowlin & Theodore Thorpe III directing
Choral Arts Society of Washington
Jace Kaholokula Saplan directing

“Living the Dream . . . Singing the Dream”
program TBA, in tribute to Martin Luther King Jr.

$25-$75
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts)
http://washingtonperformingarts.org

Feb. 6 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Lang Lang, piano
Schumann: Arabeske in C major, Op. 18
J.S. Bach: “Goldberg Variations,” BWV 988

$79-$139
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 7 (7:30 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Young Concert Artists:
Aristo Sham, piano
works TBA by J.S. Bach, Beethoven, Villa-Lobos, Piazzolla, Barber
$20-$45
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 8 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Joshua Bell, violin
Peter Dugan, piano

Beethoven: Violin Sonata in D major, Op. 12
Prokofiev: Violin Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 80
Franck: Violin Sonata in A major

$30-$130
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts)
http://washingtonperformingarts.org

Feb. 8 (8 p.m.)
Great Hall, Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 First St. SE, Washington
Quatuor Van Kuijk
Benjamin Attahir: “Al Dhikrâ”
Debussy: “Petite Suite”
(Emmanuel François arrangement)
Poulenc: 7 mélodies (Jean-Christophe Masson arrangements)
Fauré: 4 mélodies (Gildas Guillon arrangements)
Mendelssohn: Quartet in F minor, Op. 80
free; reservation required via http://blackbaud.com
(202) 707-5502
http://www.loc.gov/events/concerts-from-the-library-of-congress/concerts/upcoming-concerts/

Feb. 9 (6:30 p.m.)
Feb. 10 (6:30 p.m.)
Hardywood Park Craft Brewery, Overbrook Road at Ownby Lane, Richmond
Richmond Symphony
Chia-Hsuan Lin conducting

program TBA
$30
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://richmondsymphony.com

Feb. 9 (7:30 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News
Feb. 11 (7:30 p.m.)
Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St., Virginia Beach
Virginia Symphony Orchestra
Eric Jacobsen conducting

J.S. Bach: Concerto in C minor, BWV 1060, for violin and oboe
Vahn Armstrong, violin
Sherie Aguirre, oboe

Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5 in D minor
$25-$114
(757) 892-6366
http://virginiasymphony.org

Feb. 9 (7 p.m.)
Feb. 10 (11:30 a.m.)
Feb. 11 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Krzysztof Urbański conducting

Wojciech Kilar: “Krzesany”
Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No. 2 in G minor

Francesca Dego, violin
Stravinsky: “Le sacre du printemps”
$15-$109
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 10 (8 p.m.)
Feb. 12 (2:30 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Virginia Opera
Adam Turner conducting

Gregory Spears & Greg Pierce: “Fellow Travelers”
Joseph Lattanzi (Hawkins Fuller)
Andres Acosta (Timothy Laughlin)
Katherine Pracht (Mary Johnson)
Katrina Thurman (Miss Lightfoot)
Joshua Jeremiah (Sen. Joseph McCarthy/Estonian Frank/Interrogator)
John Fulton (Sen. Charles Potter/General Arlie/Bartender)
Kaileigh Riess (Lucy)
Kyle White (Tommy McIntyre)
Jeremy Harr (Sen. Potter’s Assistant/Bookseller/Technician/French Priest/Party Guest)
Kevin Newbury, stage director

in English, English captions
$20-$110
(866) 673-7282
http://vaopera.org

Feb. 10 (7:30 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Jacqueline Echols, soprano
Justin Austin, baritone
Griot String Quartet
Damien Sneed, piano & director

“Our Song, Our Story”
works TBA by Sneed, Margaret Bonds, Harry T. Burleigh, Richard Smallwood, Handel, Mozart, Puccini, Verdi, Gershwin, Richard Strauss

$30-$75
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts)
http://washingtonperformingarts.org

Feb. 10 (8 p.m.)
Eisenhower Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Renée Fleming VOICES:
Ute Lemper, chanteuse
works TBA by Kurt Weill & Bertholt Brecht, Hanns Eisler & Brecht, others
$49-$79
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 11 (4 p.m.)
All Saints Episcopal Church, 8787 River Road, Richmond
chamber ensemble
Charles Staples & Daniel Stipe, pianos
Christopher Reynolds, organ
Scott Hayes conducting

Britten: “Noyes Fludde”
John Bitsas (Noye)
Jenna Anderson (Mrs. Noye)
All Saints Boy & Girl Choristers

in English
$10
(804) 288-7811
http://allsaintsvamusic.com/noyesfludde

Feb. 11 (7 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
Rennolds Chamber Concerts:
Xavier Foley, double-bass
program TBA
$35
(804) 828-1169
http://arts.vcu.edu/events

Feb. 11 (7 p.m.)
Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen, 2880 Mountain Road
Richmond Symphony
Chia-Hsuan Lin conducting
Tribute Gospel Ensemble of First African Baptist Church
Michelle Lightfoot directing

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor: “Bamboula, Rhapsodic Dance No. 1”
William Grant Still: “Three Dances”
Still: “Lenox Avenue: Blues”

$40
(804) 261-2787
http://www.artsglenallen.com/performances-and-special-events/shows-and-special-events

Feb. 11 (8 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Feb. 12 (3:30 p.m.)
Martin Luther King Jr. Arts Center, Charlottesville High School, 1400 Melbourne Road
Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia
Benjamin Rous conducting

Anna Thorvaldsdóttir: “Metacosmos”
Ravel: “Alborada del gracioso”
Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 in F major (“Pastoral”)

$10-$45
(434) 924-3376
http://music.virginia.edu/events

Feb. 11 (7:30 p.m.)
Moss Arts Center, Virginia Tech, 190 Alumni Mall, Blacksburg
PUBLIQuartet
Vijay Iyer: “Dig the Say”
Fats Waller: “Pavement Pounding Rose”
(Curtis Stewart arrangement)
“MIND | THE | GAP,” improvisations on works by Ornette Coleman, Alice Coltrane, Ida Cox, Betty Davis, Tina Turner & Dvořák’s “American” Quartet
Rhiannon Giddens: “At the Purchaser’s Option”
$20-$45
(540) 231-5300
http://artscenter.vt.edu/performances

Feb. 11 (8 p.m.)
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax
Fairfax Symphony Orchestra
Christopher Zimmerman conducting

Florence Price: Violin Concerto No. 2
Sarasate: “Carmen Fantasy”
Rachel Barton Pine, violin
Dvořák: Symphony No. 7 in D minor
$45-$70
(703) 563-1990
http://fairfaxsymphony.org

Feb. 11 (8 p.m.)
St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 301 A St. SE, Washington
Concerts from the Library of Congress:
Bach Collegium Japan
Masaaki Suzuki conducting
Roderick Williams, baritone

J.S. Bach: Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B minor, BWV 1067
Johann Gottlieb Janitsch: Sonata da camera in G minor (“O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden”)
Telemann: Cantata, “Der am Ölberg zagende Jesus,” TWV 1:364
Telemann: “Paris” Quartet in D major, TWV 43:D3
J.S. Bach: Cantata, “Ich habe genug,” BWV 82

free; reservation required via http://blackbaud.com
(202) 707-5502
http://www.loc.gov/events/concerts-from-the-library-of-congress/concerts/upcoming-concerts/

Feb. 12 (7 p.m.)
Marburg House, 3102 Bute Lane, Richmond
Belvedere Series:
Elisabeth Marshall, soprano
Domenic Salerni, violin
Schuyler Slack, cello
Andrew Sommer, double-bass
Tiffany Valvo, clarinet
Ingrid Keller, piano

“Schubertiade II: An die Musik”
Schubert: “The Shepherd on the Rock,” D. 965
Schubert: Sonata in A minor, D. 821
Schubert: Piano Trio in B flat major, D. 898

$33 (waiting list)
(804) 833-1481
http://belvedereseries.org

Feb. 12 (2 p.m.)
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax
Czech National Symphony Orchestra
Steven Mercurio conducting

Brahms: Violin Concerto in D major
Robert McDuffie, violin
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 in A major
$50-$75
(703) 993-2787
http://cfa.gmu.edu

Feb. 12 (2 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Marian Anderson Vocal Award Recital:
Leah Hawkins, soprano
pianist TBA
Jacqueline Hairston: “Guide My Feet”
Wagner: “Wesendonck Lieder”
Poulenc: “Les chemins de l’amour”
Copland: “12 Poems of Emily Dickinson”
William Grant Still: “Songs of Separation”
Julian Barnes: “Proverb”
Peter Ashbourne: “5 Songs”
for soprano & piano
$39-$49
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 13 (7:30 p.m.)
Kaufman Theater, Chrysler Museum of Art, 1 Memorial Place, Norfolk
Feldman Chamber Music Society:
Verona Quartet
Beethoven: Quartet in F major, Op. 18, No. 1
Grażyna Bacewicz: Quartet No. 3
Beethoven: Quartet in in F major, Op. 59, No. 1 (“Razumovsky”)

$30
(757) 552-1630
http://feldmanchambermusic.org

Feb. 14 (7:30 p.m.)
Williamsburg Library Theatre, 515 Scotland St.
Chamber Music Society of Williamsburg:
Verona Quartet
Beethoven: Quartet in F major, Op. 18, No. 1
Grażyna Bacewicz: Quartet No. 3
Beethoven: Quartet in in F major, Op. 59, No. 1 (“Razumovsky”)

$30 (waiting list)
(757) 741-3300 (Williamsburg Regional Library)
http://chambermusicwilliamsburg.org

Feb. 15 (7:30 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Fortas Chamber Music Concerts:
Calidore String Quartet
Beethoven: Quartet in F major, Op. 135
Anna Clyne: “Breathing Statues”
George Walker: “Lyric for Strings”
Janáček: Quartet No. 2 (“Intimate Letters”)

$45
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 16 (7 p.m.)
Feb. 18 (8 p.m.)
Feb. 19 (3 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Mark Elder conducting

Mahler: Symphony No. 9
$15-$109
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 17 (7:30 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News
Feb. 18 (7:30 p.m.)
Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, Norfolk
Virginia Symphony Pops
conductor TBA
Byron Stripling, guest star
“Gospel According to Swing”
$25-$114
(757) 892-6366
http://virginiasymphony.org

Feb. 17 (7:30 p.m.)
Trinity Episcopal Church, 214 W. Beverly St., Staunton
Feb. 18 (7:30 p.m.)
All Saints Episcopal Church, 8787 River Road, Richmond
Feb. 19 (4 p.m.)
Grace Episcopal Church, 5607 Gordonsville Road, Keswick
Three Notch’d Road: the Virginia Baroque Ensemble:
Sheila Dietrich, soprano
Benjamin Geier, tenor
Peter Walker, bass, baroque guitar, säckpipa (Swedish bagpipe), seljefløyte (willow flute), & kantele (Finnish psaltery)
Fiona Hughes, baroque violin & alto
Christa Patton, triple harp, recorder, baroque flute
Philip Spray, violone & lirone

“Northern Lights: Scandinavian & Nordic”
works TBA by John Dowland, Johan Helmich Roman, Edvard Grieg, Johann Schop, Mogens Pedersøn

$25
(844) 376-6061 (Ticketbud)
http://tnrbaroque.org/concerts

Feb. 18 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orcherstra
Marin Alsop conducting

Huang Ruo: “Tipping Point”
Mahler: Symphony No. 1 in D major (“Titan”)

$35-$90
(877) 276-1444
http://strathmore.org

Feb. 19 (3 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Third Coast Percussion
Flutronix

program TBA
$35
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

Feb. 19 (7 p.m.)
Gallery5, 200 W. Marshall St., Richmond
Classical Revolution RVA:
artists TBA
program TBA
donation requested
(804) 678-8863 (Gallery5)
http://classicalrevolutionrva.com/events

Feb. 19 (2 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Vocal Arts DC:
Emily Pogorelc, soprano
Chris Reynolds, piano

works TBA by Hugo Wolf, Lili Boulanger, Joseph Schwantner
$50
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 21 (7:30 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Tuesday Evening Concerts:
Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
Respighi: “Ancient Airs and Dances” Suite No. 3
Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor

Alessio Bax, piano
Dvořák: Serenade in E major, Op. 22
$12-$39
(434) 924-3376
http://tecs.org

Feb. 22 (7 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
VCU Symphonic Wind Ensemble
Terry Austin directing

program TBA
free
(804) 828-1169
http://arts.vcu.edu/events

Feb. 22 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center
Beethoven: Piano Trio in E flat major, Op. 1, No. 1
Dohnányi: Serenade in C major, Op. 10, for string trio
Brahms: Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25

$35
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

Feb. 23 (7:30 p.m.)
Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, Norfolk
Virginia Symphony Orchestra
Eric Jacobsen conducting

Enescu: “Romanian Rhapsody” No. 1
Richard Strauss: “Don Juan”
Dvořák: Cello Concerto in B minor

Yo-Yo Ma, cello
$84-$104
(757) 892-6366
http://virginiasymphony.org

Feb. 23 (7 p.m.)
Feb. 24 (11:30 a.m.)
Feb. 25 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach conducting

Mozart: “The Marriage of Figaro” Overture
Mozart: “Exsultate, jubilate,” K. 165
Mozart: “The Marriage of Figaro” – “Dove sono”
Mozart: “Don Giovanni” – “Non mi dir”

Chen Reiss, soprano
Brahms: Symphony No. 2 in D major
$15-$109
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 24 (7:30 p.m.)
Feb. 26 (2:30 p.m.)
Jefferson Center, 541 Luck Ave., Roanoke
Opera Roanoke
Steven White conducting

Tom Cipullo: “Glory Denied”
Peter Kendall Clark (older Thompson)
John Riesen (younger Thompson)
Caroline Worra (older Alyce)
Emma Marhefka (younger Alyce)

in English
$20-$120
(540) 982-2742
http://operaroanoke.org

Feb. 25 (2 p.m.)
Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library, First and Franklin streets
Greater Richmond Children’s Choir
Crystal Jonkman directing

program TBA
free
(804) 646-7223
http://rvalibrary.org/events/gellman-concerts

Feb. 25 (8 p.m.)
Feb. 26 (3 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets,Richmond
Richmond Symphony
Valentina Peleggi conducting

Juan Pablo Contreras: “MeChicano”
Lalo: “Symphonie espagnole”

María Dueñas, violin
Brahms: Symphony No. 3 in F major
$15-$85
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://richmondsymphony.com

Feb. 25 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Brian Ganz, piano
works TBA by Chopin
$19-$99
(877) 276-1444
http://strathmore.org

Feb. 26 (2:30 p.m.)
River Road Church, Baptist, River and Ridge roads, Richmond
Washington & Lee University Singers
Shane M. Lynch directing

program TBA
free; tickets required via http://eventbrite.com
(804) 288-1131
http://rrcb.org/e-carl-freeman-concert-series/

Feb. 26 (3 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Kayhan Kalhor, kamancheh (Iranian spiked fiddle)
Persian classical works TBA
$35
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

Feb. 26 (3:30 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
UVa Chamber Music Series:
Nathaniel Lee, trombone
program TBA
$15
(434) 924-3376
http://music.virginia.edu/events

Feb. 26 (7 p.m.)
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax
Jeffrey Siegel, piano & speaker
“Keyboard Conversations: Musical Valentines”
works TBA by Brahms, Schumann, Liszt, Chopin

$29-$50
(703) 993-2787
http://cfa.gmu.edu

Feb. 27 (7:30 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Fortas Chamber Music Concerts:
Dover Quartet
Haydn: Quartet in C major, Op. 76, No. 3 (“Emperor”)
Mason Bates: “Suite for String Quartet”
Dvořák: Quartet in E flat major, Op. 51

$49
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Feb. 28 (7:30 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Denyce Graves, mezzo-soprano
Justin Austin, baritone
Laura Ward, piano

Damien Geter: “Cotton”
$30-$75
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts)
http://washingtonperformingarts.org

March 1 (8 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
VCU Symphony Orchestra
Daniel Myssyk directing

program TBA
free
(804) 828-1169
http://arts.vcu.edu/events

March 2 (7 p.m.)
March 4 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Dalia Stasevska conducting

Jessie Montgomery: “Hymn for Everyone”
Shostakovich: Concerto in C minor for piano, trumpet & strings

Conrad Tao, piano
William Gerlach, trumpet

Sibelius: Symphony No. 2 in D major
$15-$109
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

March 2 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Christian Reid conducting

Elizabeth Ogoneck: new work TBA
Brahms: Double Concerto in A minor

Jonathan Carney, violin
Dariusz Krzyzewskis, cello

Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major
$35-$90
(877) 276-1444
http://strathmore.org

March 3 (8 p.m.)
March 4 (7:30 p.m.)
March 5 (2:30 p.m.)
Harrison Opera House, 160 E. Virginia Beach Boulevard, Norfolk
Virginia Opera
Adam Turner conducting

Verdi: “La Traviata”
Brandie Sutton (Violetta)
Won Whi Choi (Alfredo)
Grant Youngblood (Germont)
Fran Daniel Laucerica (Gastone)
Jeremy Harr (Doctor Grenville)
Taylor-Alexis DuPont (Flora)
Kaileigh Riess (Annina)
Ryan Lustgarten (Giuseppe)
Kyle White (Flora’s servant)
Erik Grendahl (Baron Douphol)
Conner Grieff (Marchese d’Obigny)
Tara Faircloth, stage director

in Italian, English captions
$25-$130
(866) 673-7282
http://vaopera.org

March 3 (8 p.m.)
Coolidge Auditorium, Library of Congress, 10 First St. SE, Washington
Escher Quartet
Jason Vieaux, guitar

Beethoven: Quartet in B flat major, Op. 18, No. 6
Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco: Guitar Quintet, Op. 143
Pat Metheny: “Four Paths of Light” – movement II
J.S. Bach: Violin Sonata in G minor, BWV 1001 – Siciliano & Presto
Boccherini: Guitar Quintet in D major, G. 448 (“Fandango”)

free; reservation required via http://blackbaud.com
(202) 707-5502
http://www.loc.gov/events/concerts-from-the-library-of-congress/concerts/upcoming-concerts/

March 6 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Orchestre symphonique de Montréal
Rafael Payare conducting

Dorothy Chang: “Precipice”
Bartók: Piano Concerto No. 2

Yefim Bronfman, piano
Mahler: Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor
$30-$110
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts)
http://washingtonperformingarts.org

Doctor’s orders

Where are the concert reviews?

As I posted in December, I’m being medicated with several immunosuppressant drugs, leaving me more vulnerable to infection during the flu season and the rise of a new strain of Covid-19. My doctor specifically advises against my being in crowded public spaces. So, no concertgoing.

I look forward to attending live performances, as soon as I safely can.

Oldies and (very?) goodies

The Canadian pop star Justin Bieber has become the latest songwriter to sell the rights to royalties from his catalogue of published tunes to an investment fund, following the likes of Bob Dylan and the late Leonard Cohen. Bieber’s deal is said to be worth about $200 million.

The songwriters “are selling the rights to their work – in other words, to collect royalties largely from streaming of their back catalogue,” Anya Wassenberg reports on the website Ludwig van Toronto. “About 70 percent of the music consumed today is older music,” making these songs, some decades old, valuable assets.

All the more valuable as lawmakers in various countries keep extending the periods of copyright protection. In this country, per the US Copyright Office, works “created and fixed in a tangible medium of expression” after Jan. 1, 1978, remain under copyright protection for the lifetime of the author or longest-living co-author, plus 70 years. The term of protection ranges from 70 to 120 years for works copyrighted before 1978.

If Bieber, who was born in 1994, lives 86 years (the current statistical life expectancy of male Canadians), the catalogue he has sold will remain under US copyright protection until 2150. Dylan is 81; if he were to die now, his pre-1978 works – the likely basis of his being awarded the Nobel Prize in literature – could remain under protection until 2143.

Now, it seems there’s a budding market for “music futures,” in which investors bet on tunes or musical genres likely to produce high royalty payments in years to come, Wassenberg reports. Clouty, a Chicago-based firm “re-imagining the value of music by making it a tradable asset,” last summer launched MUSIQ, a music-trading index that could be the basis of “an exchange-traded fund to make it easy for investors to jump into the game.”

FEATURE | Music Finance: Where The Real Money Is Being Made

(via http://www.artsjournal.com)

Gambling on whose current hits will be royalty-rich 20 or 30 years from now? That makes sports betting look pretty lame.

The rights to works of “classical” composers – in quotes because the definition is so open-ended now – are not as lucrative as those for pop songs, with the notable exceptions of some film and television scores. (Imagine the bidding war for the John Williams catalogue.)

Betting on a classical work’s future financial value is probably more speculative than it would be in pop. It’s certainly more long-term: Few pieces composed since the 1970s have entered the canon of widely acclaimed, regularly performed concert music or opera, thus generating reliable royalty income; so the bet is on a composer’s stature a generation or more in the future.

Classical and pop music have this in common: One generation’s hits and masterworks may be future generations’ historical novelties or hoary relics.

Had today’s copyright laws been in effect and a music-futures market been up and running in the 19th century, rights to Giacomo Meyerbeer’s then-popular operas would have been a hot commodity. Not so hot in 1934, 70 years after his death, and not even lukewarm by 1984, had post-mortem protection lasted 120 years. Conversely, rights to Anton Bruckner’s symphonies, rarely performed in his lifetime, would have skyrocketed in value. (The steady-income bet would have been Johann Strauss II.)

Care to bet on the royalty value of music by Philip Glass, John Corigliano, Arvo Pärt or Rodion Shchedrin, let alone compositions by younger fry such as Anna Clyne, Anna Thorvaldsdóttir, Mason Bates or Jessie Montgomery, in the 2080s? I wouldn’t – but, then, I don’t frequent roulette tables or buy lottery tickets.

Letter V Classical Radio Jan. 30

1-3 p.m. EST
1800-2000 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
http://wdce.org

Bohuslav Martinů: “La revue de cuisine”
The Dartington Ensemble
(Hyperion)

Mozart: Oboe Quartet in F major, K. 370
Robin Williams, oboe
Scottish Chamber Orchestra members
(Linn)

Stravinsky: “L’histoire du soldat” Suite
Orchestra of St. Luke’s members/Robert Craft
(Naxos)

Louise Farrenc: Sextet in C minor, Op. 40, for piano & winds
Éric Le Sage, piano
Les Vents Français
(Erato)

Brahms: Horn Trio in E flat major, Op. 40
Jane Coop, piano
Martin Beaver, violin
Martin Hackleman, French horn
(CBC Musica Viva)

All the Rachmaninoff you can eat

Updated Sept. 29

Pianist Yuja Wang, who at 20, in 2007, dazzled a University of Richmond audience with her performances of Maurice Ravel’s “La valse” and Alexander Scriabin’s Sonata No. 2 in G sharp minor, went on to become a globally celebrated virtuoso, excelling especially in the concertos of Sergei Rachmaninoff. (Also noteworthy/notorious for her fashion choices and lifestyle, which have made her a face in celeb “news.”)

Now a seasoned 35-year-old, Wang is playing all four Rachmaninoff concertos and his “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” with the Philadelphia Orchestra and its music director, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, in pairs of programs between Jan. 26 and Feb. 5 at Philly’s Verizon Hall, and in a single marathon performance, expected to run 3½ hours, on Jan. 28 at New York’s Carnegie Hall.

A star-studded celebration of the composer’s 150th anniversary year: Philly has been “Rachmaninoff’s orchestra” since he recorded the concertos and rhapsody with them in the late-1920s and early ’30s, and Wang currently is one of the best-known pianists playing them. (One of the best? It’s a crowded and accomplished field.)

Star power aside, this will be a hard-core undertaking for performers and audiences alike.

Rachmaninoff’s two best-known concertos, the Second and Third, are sufficiently long, eventful and note-heavy to satisfy any healthy appetite for the composer and/or piano-playing. The rhapsody, while shorter, is also a plateful. Add the lesser-known First and Fourth concertos, each running half an hour or so. Presumably, there will be an intermission or two (or three?). Even with breaks, though, I would anticipate a musical event not unlike one of those all-you-can-eat competitions popular in the future diabetic and stroke-victim communities.

From the performer’s perspective, Wang, speaking to The New York Times’ Javier C. Hernández, opts for a combat metaphor: “Let’s see where this kamikaze run is going to go. I can’t even control it, so I’m just going to go with the flow.”

UPDATE: Wang “brought both clarity and poetry. She played with heft but not bombast, sentiment but not schmaltz. Her touch can certainly be firm, but not a single note was harsh or overly heavy; her prevailing style is sprightly, which is why the concert didn’t feel like eating five slices of chocolate cake in a row,” The Times’ Zachary Wolfe writes in his review of the concert:

Middle-aged standard-bearers

For what seems like forever, the classical music world has obsessed on the very young and the very old.

Concert stages and recording studios are packed with hot young instrumentalists, singers and conductors; 20-somethings are leading major orchestras and performing pieces that 40-somethings used to approach with caution.

Meanwhile, we’re witnessing the fast fadeout of a generation of artists who have been the class acts of classical music since the 1970s. Age and illness have led conductors Michael Tilson Thomas and Daniel Barenboim to give up podiums, and pianists Maurizio Pollini and Martha Argerich to withdraw from engagements. Riccardo Muti is in his last season as music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Neeme Järvi rarely conducts outside his homeland, Estonia. Pianist and conductor Vladimir Ashkenazy has retired. Itzhak Perlman, the most stellar violinist of the past 50 years, is performing far less frequently. We don’t hear much anymore from pianist Murray Perahia. Veteran string quartets, most recently the Emerson and Orion, are disbanding. I could go on . . .

Amid this shuffle of arrivals and departures, who are today’s adults on the stage – mature, active exemplars of classical performance, artists who can be relied upon to do justice to the masterpieces, and, ideally, connect with living composers and make persuasive cases for new music?

Some esteemed veterans are still at it, notably Herbert Blomstedt, who at 95 continues to conduct major European orchestras in demanding repertory. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma is as busy as ever, and is still the most widely recognized classical musician. Ma’s longtime duo partner, pianist Emanuel Ax, maintains a full schedule of solo, concerto and chamber-music dates, as do pianists András Schiff and Yefim Bronfman. Long-leading lights in the historical performance practice field – William Christie, Robert Levin, John Eliot Gardiner, Philippe Herreweghe, Jordi Savall – remain active and influential.

None of these artists (not even Blomstedt) is immortal, however, and sooner rather than later, younger performers will be the most prominent and valued figures in classical music, if not stars à la Perlman, Ma or Argerich.

Thinking back on performances I’ve heard over the past 10 or 15 years (live and recorded), I’ve come up with a list of middle-aged musicians – mid-30s to mid-60s – whom I would rate as present and future classical standard-bearers. Many big names are absent. I haven’t overlooked them; I’ve looked them over, and I find them . . . reliable (usually). I’ve limited my choices to artists who most persuasively and insightfully take me into the music they play.

I thought about listing singers, and soon decided not to. I’m not an operaphile, and there are too many subjective and/or specialized factors, too many cases of good in this/not so good in that, to pick six or eight leaders from a populous and diverse talent pool.

My honor roll:

Conductors: Manfred Honeck, Iván Fischer, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Paavo Järvi, Vasily Petrenko, Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, Sakari Oramo, Susanna Mälkki, Thomas Wilkins, Jakub Hrůša, Kazuki Yamada, Edward Gardner, François-Xavier Roth, Andrew Manze.

Pianists: Igor Levit, Leif Ove Andsnes, Evgeny Kissin, Stephen Hough, Marc-André Hamelin, Charles Richard-Hamelin (no relation), Shai Wosner, Jeremy Denk, Angela Hewitt, Alessio Bax, Jean-Efflam Bavouzet, Denis Kozhukhin, Víkingur Ólafsson, Orli Shaham, Stewart Goodyear, Orion Weiss, Sunwook Kim . . . enough, already – this is a golden age of pianists.

Period keyboard players: Ronald Brautigam (fortepiano), Kristian Bezuidenhout (fortepiano), Jean Rondeau (harpsichord), Mahan Esfahani (harpsichord).

Violinists: Gil Shaham, Leonidas Kavakos, Isabelle Faust, Hilary Hahn, Christian Tetzlaff, Nicola Benedetti, Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Jennifer Koh, James Ehnes.

Cellists: Pieter Wispelwey, Steven Isserlis, Truls Mørk, Maximilian Hornung, Ralph Kirshbaum, Jean-Guihen Queyras.

Wind soloists: Emmanuel Pahud (flute), Sharon Bezaly (flute), Albrecht Mayer (oboe), Martin Fröst (clarinet), Anthony McGill (clarinet), Radovan Vlatković (French horn), Tine Thing Helseth (trumpet).

String quartets: Danish, Pavel Haas, Jerusalem, Miró, Doric, Belcea, Dover.

Early music: Collegium 1704 (orchestra & chorus), Handel + Haydn Society, Boston (orchestra & chorus), Apollo’s Fire (orchestra & chorus), Rachel Podger (violin), Stile Antico (vocal ensemble), Voces8 (vocal ensemble), Cappella Romana (vocal ensemble).

Not many household names . . . yet.

Letter V Classical Radio Jan. 23

Where would the orchestra be without the symphony? Once a background or supportive presence in churches, theaters, ballrooms, feasts and festivals, the orchestra emerged as a concert-giving entity with the development of the symphony in the early classical (rococo) and classical periods of the 18th century. In this program we’ll hear this musical form being born around 1750 and growing in scale and sophistication over the next half-century.

1-3 p.m. EST
1800-2000 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
http://wdce.org

Giovanni Battista Sammartini: Sinfonia in A major, J-C 62
Aradia Ensemble/Kevin Mallon
(Naxos)

C.P.E. Bach: Sinfonia in E flat major, Wq. 183, No. 2
Ensemble Resonanz/Riccardo Minasi
(Es-Dur)

Haydn: Symphony No. 60 in C major (“Il distratto”)
Combattimento Consort Amsterdam/Jan Willem de Vriend
(Etcetera)

Mozart: Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201
Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
(Deutsche Grammophon)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 2 in D major
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen/Paavo Järvi
(RCA)

Classical chart-toppers in 2022

Some surprises and unexpected high-flyers turn up in the latest yearly rankings by the British classical website Bachtrack of most-played works and top musicians, based on the programs of some 23,000 concert and opera performances listed on the site in 2022.

While the year saw more variety and novelty in recordings, and considerably more programming of works by female, Black, Latino and Asian composers, standard repertory (i.e., by dead male Europeans from the classical and romantic eras) still ruled onstage:

– Mozart was the composer most often played in concerts, although none of his concertos made top-10 lists. Richard Strauss was a leading choice; but, curiously, there were fewer performances of his orchestral works than of suite(s) from his opera “Der Rosenkavalier.” Other top composers were Beethoven, J.S. Bach, Brahms, Schubert, Schumann, Tchaikovsky, Chopin and Ravel (whose “La valse,” interestingly, was played more often than “Boléro”).

– Ravel topped the piano-concerto chart with his G major (the two-handed one). Rachmaninoff’s Second was in second place and his Third and “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” also made the top 10. Concertos by Beethoven (Nos. 3, 4, 5), Brahms (No. 1), Schumann and Tchaikovsky rounded out the list.

– Among top-10 violin concertos, four may be surprises: Prokofiev’s First, Shostakovich’s First and those by Stravinsky and Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Otherwise, old favorites held sway, with Mendelssohn leading the pack, followed by Beethoven, Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Bruch and Brahms.

– Among cello concertos, Elgar’s beat Dvořák’s, with Shostakovich’s First in third place. (There were no Nos. 4 to 10; once past the two by Haydn, Saint-Saëns’ First and the Schumann, the repertory crosses into sonus incognita.)

– Orchestral rankings were dominated by US ensembles (Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles), along with the Berlin Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, and two seeming dark horses from Austria: the Vienna Symphony Orchestra and Tonkünstler Orchestra, which divides its time between Vienna and St. Pölten. Two usually rated among the world’s best, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra of Munich, did not make this top 10.

– The conductors’ list was topped by Andris Nelsons, maestro of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig, followed by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra and Metropolitan Opera. Veterans (Paavo Järvi, Simon Rattle, Manfred Honeck, Iván Fischer, Daniel Harding, Gustavo Dudamel) shared the top 10 with Klaus Mäkelä, the soon-to-be 27-year-old chief conductor of the Oslo Philharmonic and Orchestre de Paris and chief-designate of the Royal Concertgebouw, and Andrés Orozco-Estrada, 45, formerly music director in Houston and Frankfurt, now leading the Tonkünstler Orchestra. (The maestro and the band both scored – party time in St. Pölten?)

– Generational change among leading performers was most pronounced in soloists’ rankings. Among 30 names in three top tens, only nine were widely prominent a decade ago. Pianist Yuja Wang, violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja and cellist Gautier Capuçon took top spots in their instrumental categories.

– The most frequently staged opera composer was Mozart, with “The Marriage of Figaro,” “The Magic Flute,” “Don Giovanni” and (surprisingly?) “Così fan tutte” in the top 10, along with three Puccinis (“La Bohème,” “Tosca,” “Madame Butterfly”), two Verdis (“La Traviata,” “Rigoletto”) and a Bizet (“Carmen”).

– Arvo Pärt was the most frequently programmed contemporary composer, followed, in order, by John Williams, John Adams, Thomas Adès, Philip Glass, Jörg Widmann, Sofia Gubaidulina, Anna Clyne, Wolfgang Rihm and James MacMillan. Performances of contemporary works rose most over the past three years in the US, Austria, the Netherlands, Spain, Hungary and Switzerland.

– Bach was the only top-10 composer active before the classical period. The lists include only two soloists (violinist Isabelle Faust and cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras), no period-instrument orchestras and no conductors more than peripherally associated with historical performance practice. (Many “modern” conductors and soloists, however, employ some historical techniques.)

In sum: Orchestras and opera companies still concentrate on composers whose busts you can set atop your piano. . . . Young and young-ish artists’ dominance in the soloists’ rankings explains the frequent programming of Rachmaninoff’s piano concertos (hot young virtuoso makes dazzling first impression), as well as the high rankings of less familiar violin and cello concertos (smart move: Save Beethoven, Brahms and Dvořák until you’re more seasoned). . . . For long-dead Europeans, you can’t beat opera: The most recently composed work in the top 10 was “Madame Butterfly,” which dates from 1904. . . . Older composers and works with lengthy performance histories are favored even in newer music – only two contemporary composers younger than 50 (Clyne, 42, and Widmann, 49) made the top 10. . . . It’s striking, probably revealing, to see the absence of some of the most accomplished and high-profile musicians – Riccardo Muti, Herbert Blomstedt, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Yo-Yo Ma, Joshua Bell, Marc-André Hamelin, among many others.

To access Bachtrack’s top tens and other rankings, start here:

http://bachtrack.com/classical-music-statistics-2022

(via http://www.artsjournal.com)

Dingwall Fleary Jr. (1940-2022)

Dingwall Fleary Jr., longtime conductor of orchestras in Northern Virginia, died on New Year’s Eve at 82.

A native of St. Louis, Fleary was appointed in 1972 as the first conductor of the McLean Chamber Orchestra, now the McLean Symphony, and since 1996 had led the Reston Community Orchestra. A pianist, harpsichordist and organist, he was music director of Emmanuel Lutheran Church in Bethesda, MD.

A graduate of the University of Kansas and Northwestern University who also studied at L’Accademia Musicale di Chigiana in Siena, Italy, Fleary taught at Bennett and Vassar colleges in New York in the 1960s.

He was the playwright and star of “The Measure of a Man: the Life of Paul Robeson,” which was premiered in 1987 and subsequently staged on a US tour.

Fleary had served as music director and coordinator of the International Children’s Festival at Wolf Trap and as a four-term board member of the Virginia Commission for the Arts.

An obituary in the Tysons Reporter:

McLean Symphony founder and longtime conductor Dingwall Fleary dies