British violinist slams ‘Jurassic FM’

Nigel Kennedy, the British violinist known for mixing classical, popular and folk music in his performances and recordings, has canceled a date at London’s Royal Albert Hall with the Chineke! orchestra, known for its ethnically diverse membership and programming, after Classic FM, the network that was to have aired the concert, nixed Kennedy’s plan to present a tribute to rock great Jimi Hendrix and requested Vivaldi’s “The Four Seasons” instead.

In canceling the performance, Kennedy attacked the classical channel as “culturally prejudiced” and re-christened it “Jurassic FM,” The Guardian’s Dalya Alberge reports:

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2021/sep/20/violinist-nigel-kennedy-cancels-concert-after-classic-fm-stops-hendrix-tribute

About reviewing

I had hoped that by now I would be attending concerts and writing reviews of them. Then along came the Delta variant of Covid-19.

Although I’m fully vaccinated – and, given that the classical-music crowd trends older, I might safely assume that most people in concert audiences would be vaccinated, too – infection rates are rising and various case-trackers show most of Virginia in high-risk territory.

So, for a while yet – a short while, I hope, for more than concertgoing reasons – I’ve decided to continue playing it safe.

I’ll miss hearing today’s Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia-sponsored program by the Thalea String Quartet and cellist James Wilson. I’ll also miss attending next weekend’s season-opening Masterworks program by the Richmond Symphony; but I’ve signed up for the “Symphony at Home” video-audio stream that goes online a few days later and plan to review that performance.

And then we’ll see how things look in October and beyond.

Symphony offers at-home option

The Richmond Symphony had added a “Symphony at Home” viewing and listening option: Videos recorded at the eight mainstage Masterworks programs in the symphony’s 2021-22 season.

The videos will be posted on the Wednesdays following the orchestra’s Saturday night and Sunday afternoon performances at the Carpenter Theatre of Dominion Energy Center.

Access to the videos is $180 for all eight concerts or $30 per program. All videos will be accessible through June 30, 2022.

For more information, call the symphony’s patron services desk at (804) 788-1212, or visit http://www.richmondsymphony.com/ticketing/rvasymphonyathome/

VCU Rennolds Chamber Concerts 2021-22

Virginia Commonwealth University’s Mary Anne Rennolds Chamber Concerts will present four performances in its 2021-22 season.

The Harlem String Quartet will open the series at 3 p.m. Oct. 3, and pianist Jon Nakamatsu will perform at 7 p.m. Oct. 16, both in VCU’s Grace Street Theater, 934 W. Grace St., with general-admission seating.

The series plans to return to VCU’s Singleton Arts Center, Grove Avenue at Harrison Street, with Imani Winds at 3 p.m. Feb. 13 and the Viano String Quartet at 7 p.m. April 2.

Their programs will be announced later.

Tickets are $30 per concert. For more information, call the VCU Music Department at (804) 828-1166 or visit http://arts.vcu.edu/academics/departments/music/concerts-and-events/rennolds-series/

Van Zweden leaving New York Philharmonic

Jaap van Zweden will relinquish his post as music director of the New York Philharmonic at the end of the 2023-24 season.

The 60-year-old Dutch conductor said “that the upheaval of the pandemic had prompted him to reconsider his relationship with the orchestra, which he has led since 2018, as well as with his family, which he rarely got to see during his globe-trotting days before the Covid crisis,” The New York Times’ Javier C. Hernández reports.

“It is not out of frustration, it’s not out of anger, it’s not out of a difficult situation,” Van Zweden told Hernández. “It’s just out of freedom.”

Van Zweden joins several other internationally prominent conductors recently announcing seemingly early departures from orchestras. Simon Rattle, music director of the London Symphony Orchestra since 2017, will leave that post and assume artistic direction of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra of Munich in 2023. (Rattle’s wife, the Czech mezzo-soprano Magdalena Kožená, and their children live in Germany. Rattle has applied for German citizenship.) Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, the Lithuanian music director of Britain’s City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra since 2016, will be leaving at the end of this season.

Cynthia Hansell-Bakić (1948-2021)

Cynthia Hansell-Bakić, a Virginia-born soprano who built her career as one of the leading opera singers in Croatia, has died at 73.

Born in Arlington to a family of prominent Shenandoah Valley landowners, Cynthia Hansell studied at the New England Conservatory of Music and was a soloist in its chorus. She emigrated to Croatia in 1971 and married Ante Bakić, a scientist, in 1973. Bakić died in 1990.

With a repertory of more than 60 roles, ranging from Monteverdi and Mozart to contemporary works, Hansell-Bakić sang in opera houses throughout the former Yugoslavia, as well as the Mozarteum in Salzburg, and taught at the Academy of Music in Zagreb and Split.

A profile of the singer by Marija Barbieri for Croatia’s International Summer Music School Pucisca:

http://www.music-school-pucisca.com/cynthia_hansel.html

Breakthrough coming for female conductors?

The New York Times’ Javier C. Hernández surveys the sparsity of female conductors among the major US orchestras, a situation that has persisted for decades after the emergence of Marin Alsop, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra’s music director from 2007 until earlier this year, and JoAnn Falletta, who leads the Buffalo Philharmonic and spent nearly 30 years at the helm of the Virginia Symphony Orchestra.

“Across 174 American ensembles of all sizes,” Hernández reports, “about 9 percent of music directors were women in 2016, the last year for which data [are] available, according to the League of American Orchestras.”

“[P]rogress has been painfully slow,” said Mark Volpe, former president and chief executive of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Volpe and other orchestra leaders expect that to change, perhaps rapidly. Hernández notes that “roughly a third of the music directors at the top 25 largest orchestras in the United States are planning to step down over the next several years,” and that administrators and conductor search committee members at several majors are determined to include women in their recruitment of new artistic leaders:

Virginians may read the Times article as time-capsule news: In addition to Falletta at the Norfolk-based Virginia Symphony, the orchestras of Roanoke, Charlottesville and Williamsburg have employed female music directors. Alsop, who was the Richmond Symphony’s associate conductor more than 30 years ago, was the first in an ongoing succession of women serving as associate or assistant conductors at Virginia orchestras. The Richmond Symphony’s current artistic and administrative leaders – Music Director Valentina Peleggi, Associate Conductor Chia-Hsuan Lin, Choral Director Erin Freeman and Executive Director Lacey Huszcza – are all women.

2021-22 season overview

Our annual overview of classical events in the Richmond area comes with what by now is an all-too-familiar qualifier: Scheduled events are subject to change depending on public-health circumstances.

One of the area’s major presenters, the University of Richmond’s Modlin Arts Center, has announced events only through December. Virginia Commonwealth University has scheduled four concerts for its Rennolds Chamber Concerts series, but the VCU Music Department has not yet announced 2021-22 events by its faculty and student ensembles.

Two 50th anniversaries, of the Richmond Symphony Chorus (a year late due to the pandemic) and the Richmond Philharmonic, are being marked this season. If you can’t get enough of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, May 2022 will be a moveable feast: Both ensembles are performing the Ninth within a week of each other. The Symphony Chorus’ anniversary celebration also features Haydn’s oratorio “The Creation” in April. And, to complete a choral-masterworks spring trifecta, the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart’s Schola Cantorum with Three Notch’d Road: the Virginia Baroque Ensemble will perform J.S. Bach’s Mass in B minor in May.

Other highlights of the season include the Richmond debut in October of baritone Will Liverman, fresh off his starring role in Terence Blanchard’s “Fire Shut Up in My Bones,” the first work by an African-American composer to be staged by New York’s Metropolitan Opera; a Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia season framed by major works of Schubert, the String Quintet in C major in September and the Octet in F major in May; and the Richmond Symphony playing Klaus Simon’s rarely heard chamber-orchestra arrangement of Mahler’s Fourth Symphony in March.

Conflicting performances on the same dates – chronic in weekend-centric concert schedules – crop up here and there, but not as frequently or unavoidably (thanks to multiple dates of programs) as we’ve experienced in some past seasons.

Here’s what has been scheduled to date. Once other performances are announced, I’ll add to these listings. Links to ensembles’ and presenters’ websites follow the month-by-month lineup.

SEPTEMBER
12 – Richmond Symphony
with Daisuke Yamamoto, violin (“Violins of Hope”) (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
18 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library)
19 – Virginia Opera: Wagner’s “Das Rheingold” (TopGolf Richmond)
19 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (Seventh Street Christian Church)
25-26 – Richmond Symphony with Louis Schwizgebel, piano (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
26 – Christopher Martin, organ (River Road Church, Baptist)

OCTOBER
3 – Harlem Quartet
(Grace Street Theater, Virginia Commonwealth University)
14 – Richmond Symphony (Hardywood Park Craft Brewery)
16 – Jon Nakamatsu, piano (Grace Street Theater, Virginia Commonwealth University)
17 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library)
18 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia: Johnny Gandelsman, violin (Historic Mankin Mansion)
22 – Vox Humana chorus with Robert Gallagher, organ & piano (River Road Church, Baptist)
23-24 – Richmond Symphony with Sterling Elliott, cello (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
28 – Will Liverman, baritone; pianist TBA (Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond)
30 – Richmond Symphony LolliPops (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)

NOVEMBER
7 – Richmond Philharmonic
(location TBA)
13-14 – Richmond Symphony (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
18 – Richmond Symphony (Hardywood Park Craft Brewery)
19 – Clara Gerdes, organ (River Road Church, Baptist)
19/21 – Virginia Opera: Puccini’s “La Bohème” (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
27 – Richmond Symphony Pops (“Let It Snow!”) (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
29 – Commonwealth Catholic Charities Christmas Concert with Richmond Symphony & others TBA (Cathedral of the Sacred Heart)

DECEMBER
1 – University of Richmond Symphony Orchestra
with Matthew Robinson, violin & Rilyn McKallip, flute (UR Modlin Arts Center)
4 – Richmond Symphony & Symphony Chorus (“A Baroque Holiday”) (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
5 – University of Richmond Schola Cantorum & Women’s Chorale (Festival of Lessons and Carols) (UR Cannon Memorial Chapel)
5 – Chenault Organ Duo & River Road Chancel Choir (River Road Church, Baptist)
6 – Forgotten Clefs: Renaissance Wind Ensemble (Cathedral of the Sacred Heart)
10 – Central Virginia Masterworks Chorale & ensemble (Grace Baptist Church)
10 – Advent Lessons and Carols (Cathedral of the Sacred Heart)
12 – River Road Chancel Choir with orchestra (Handel’s “Messiah,” Advent portion & “Hallelujah” Chorus) (River Road Church, Baptist)
12 – Central Virginia Masterworks Chorale & ensemble (Duncan Memorial United Methodist Church, Ashland)

JANUARY
15 – Richmond Symphony
with Amaryn Olmeda, violin (“Dreams of Freedom”) (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
21 – Richmond Symphony with Mary Boodell, flute (Perkinson Arts Center, Chester)
21 – Dexter Kennedy, organ (St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church)
23 – Richmond Symphony with Mary Boodell, flute (Blackwell Auditorium, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland)
29-30 – Richmond Symphony with Stefan Jackiw, violin (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)

FEBRUARY
5 – Richmond Symphony Pops
with Tony DeSare & Capathia Jenkins, vocalists (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
6 – St. Olaf Choir (River Road Church, Baptist)
10 – Richmond Symphony (Hardywood Park Craft Brewery)
11/13 – Virginia Opera: Jake Heggie’s “Three Decembers” (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
13 – Richmond Symphony (“Bugs Bunny at the Symphony!”) (Altria Theater)
13 – Imani Winds (Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University)
26-27 – Richmond Symphony with George Li, piano (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)

MARCH
6 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia
(Seventh Street Christian Church)
10 – Richmond Symphony (Hardywood Park Craft Brewery)
13 – Richmond Philharmonic (location TBA)
19-20 – Richmond Symphony with Daisuke Yamamoto, violin (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
20 – Jory Vinikour, harpsichord (River Road Church, Baptist)
27 – Richmond Symphony (Blackwell Auditorium, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland)

APRIL
1/3 – Virginia Opera
: Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro” (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
2 – Viano Quartet (Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University)
9-10 – Richmond Symphony with Richmond Symphony Chorus & soloists (Haydn’s “The Creation”) (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
11 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (Church of the Holy Comforter, Episcopal)
23 – Richmond Symphony Pops with Rex Richardson, trumpet (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
29 – Richmond Symphony with Thomas Schneider, bassoon (Perkinson Arts Center, Chester)
29 – Amanda Mole, organ (Ginter Park Presbyterian Church)

MAY
1 – Richmond Symphony
with Thomas Schneider, bassoon (Blackwell Auditorium, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland)
1 – John Tibbetts, baritone, with Raymond Chenault, piano (River Road Church, Baptist)
6 – Cathedral Schola Cantorum with Three Notch’d Road: the Virginia Baroque Ensemble (J.S. Bach’s Mass in B minor) (Cathedral of the Sacred Heart)
7 – Richmond Symphony LolliPops with Really Inventive Stuff’s Michael Boudewyns (Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf”) (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)
14 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library)
15 – Richmond Symphony (“Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back”) (Altria Theater)
15 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (First Unitarian Universalist Church)
15 – Richmond Philharmonic with Central Virginia Masterworks Chorale, Richmond Concert Chorale & soloists (Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony) (location TBA)
21-22 – Richmond Symphony with Richmond Symphony Chorus & soloists (Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony) (Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center)

JUNE
5 – River Road Chancel Choir
with David Briggs, organ (River Road Church, Baptist)
24 – Virginia Commonwealth University Health Orchestra (Cathedral of the Sacred Heart)

Richmond Symphony: http://www.richmondsymphony.com
Virginia Opera: http://vaopera.org
Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond: http://modlin.richmond.edu
Virginia Commonwealth University Music Department: http://arts.vcu.edu/academics/departments/music/concerts-and-events/
Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia: http://cmscva.org
Richmond Philharmonic: http://richmondphilharmonic.org
Richmond chapter, American Guild of Organists’ Repertoire Recital Series: http://richmondago.org/organ-repertoire-recital-series
Cathedral of the Sacred Heart concert series: http://richmondcathedral.org/concerts/
River Road Church, Baptist, concert series: http://rrcb.org/concertseries
Central Virginia Masterworks Chorale: http://cvamc.org

Mikis Theodorakis (1925-2021)

Mikis Theodorakis, the Greek composer best-known for his scores for the films “Zorba the Greek,” “Serpico” and “Z,” has died at 96.

In Greece, Theodorakis may have been as well-known for his political activism as for his music. An officer in partisan forces during the Nazi occupation in World War II, he was imprisoned by the British for activities in the leftist underground during the postwar Greek Civil War, and was jailed and then exiled by the military junta that ruled the country from 1967 to 1974. The regime also banned his music.

A onetime student of Olivier Messiaen, Theodorakis in the 1960s began to turn away from prevailing styles of modernist composition to incorporate traditional songs, dances and instruments, notably the bouzouki, into his works. In addition to his film scores, he was known for his songs and operas, a number of them set to classical Greek texts.

An obituary by Gail Holst-Warhaft for The Guardian:

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2021/sep/02/mikis-theodorakis-obituary

September calendar

Optimistically returning to our pre-pandemic calendar format, with the proviso that the course of Covid-19 infections may require postponements, cancellations and other changes. Most indoor venues have instituted seating limitations, mask-wearing requirements and other safety measures. Check with presenters and/or venues for details.

Sept. 2 (7:30 p.m.)
Lake Matoaka Amphitheater, 121 Ukrop Way, Williamsburg
Sept. 5 (7 p.m.)
Chesapeake City Park, 900 City Park Drive
Sept. 9 (7:30 p.m.)
31st Street Park, 31st Street at oceanfront, Virginia Beach
Virginia Symphony Orchestra
conductor TBA
students of Governor’s School for the Arts
“Symphony under the Stars”
Copland: “Rodeo” – “Hoe Down”
Richard Rodgers (arr. Bennett): “The King and I” (excerpts)
Brahms: “Hungarian Dance” No. 5 in G minor
Antonio Carlos Jobim: “The Girl from Ipanema”
Florence Price: Symphony No. 1 in E minor – “Juba Dance”
Johann Strauss II: “Thunder and Lightning Polka”
Rouse: “Orange Blossom Special”
John Kander: “Chicago” medley
Garland: “In the Mood”
Gamble TSOP: “The Sound of Philadelphia”
Saint-Saëns: “Samson et Dalila” – Bacchanale
Pharrell Williams: “Happy”

free
(757) 892-6366
http://virginiasymphony.org

Sept. 4 (3 p.m.)
Sept. 5 (3 p.m.)
Herter Hall, Garth Newel Music Center, off Route 220 between Warm Springs & Hot Springs, Bath County
Garth Newel Piano Quartet
Wanchi, violin

Dvořák: “Cypresses”
Dvořák: Piano Quintet in A major, Op. 81

$25 (concert); $50 (concert with picnic); $55 (concert with wine); $80 (concert with picnic & wine)
(540) 839-5018
http://garthnewel.org

Sept. 5 (8 p.m.)
West Lawn of US Capitol, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Larry Loh conducting
Ben Folds, vocalist
Charlie Young, saxophone

Labor Day Concert
works TBA by Duke Ellington, Carlos Simon, Jessie Montgomery, Michael Abels
free
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Sept. 8 (7:30 p.m.)
The Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Road, Vienna
Opera Lafayette
Ryan Brown directing

François-André Danican Philidor: “Le maréchal ferrant” (“The Blacksmith”)
Pascale Beaudin & Emilie Faiella, sopranos
Arnold Livingston Geis & Frank Kelley, tenors
Dominque Côté, baritone
Joshua Conyers, bass-baritone
Ryan Brown, violin
Dom Flemons & Dylan Kober, guitars
Doug Balliett, bass
Nick Olcott, stage direction

sung in English
$38
(703) 255-1868
http://wolftrap.org

Sept. 9 (7:30 p.m.)
Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Charlottesville
Charlottesville Chamber Music Festival:
Amy Schwartz Moretti & Timothy Summers, violins
Nicholas Cords, viola
Edward Arron, cello
Raphael Bell, cello
Andrew Armstrong & Lukáš Vondráček, piano

Jessie Montgomery: Rhapsody No. 1 for solo violin
Beethoven: Piano Trio in D major, Op. 70, No. 1 (“Ghost”)
Dvořák: Piano Quartet in E flat major, Op. 87

$6-$25
(434) 979-1922
http://theparamount.net

Sept. 10 (12:30 p.m.)
Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Charlottesville
Charlottesville Chamber Music Festival:
Tessa Lark, Amy Schwartz Moretti & Timothy Summers, violins
Nicholas Cords, viola
Edward Arron & Raphael Bell, cellos
Andrew Armstrong & Lukáš Vondráček, piano

Community Concert
Offenbach: Duo for two cellos
Martinů: “Three Madrigals” for violin and viola
William Grant Still: “Mother and Child”
Dvořák-Kreisler: “Songs My Mother Taught Me”

free
(434) 979-1922
http://theparamount.net

Sept. 10 (7:30 p.m.)
Kennedy Center, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Gianandrea Noseda conducting
Isabel Leonard, mezzo-soprano
US Marine Band (“The President’s Own”)

speakers TBA
“Concert of Remembrance” for victims of the pandemic
program TBA

free (first-come, first-served)
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Sept. 12 (3 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Richmond Symphony
Valentina Peleggi conducting

“Violins of Hope”
Schubert: Quartet in D minor, D. 810 (“Death and the Maiden”)
(Mahler orchestration)
Pavel Haas: “Study for Strings”
Grażyna Bacewicz: Concerto for string orchestra

Ilse Weber: “Wiegala” (Fernando Arroyo orchestration)
John Williams: Theme from “Schindler’s List” (Robert Longfield orchestration)
Daisuke Yamamoto, violin
Mahler: Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor – Adagietto
$10-$35
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

Sept. 14 (7:30 p.m.)
Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Charlottesville
Charlottesville Chamber Music Festival:
James Ehnes, Tessa Lark & Timothy Summers, violins
Nicholas Cords, viola
Edward Arron & Raphael Bell, cellos
Andrew Armstrong, piano

Janáček: Quartet No. 1 (“Kreutzer Sonata”)
Reena Esmail: “Zeher” (“Poison”)
Josef Suk: “Meditation on the Old Czech Chorale” (“St. Wenceslas”)
Tchaikovsky: Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 50

$6-$25
(434) 979-1922
http://theparamount.net

Sept. 14 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
JoAnn Falletta, Steven Reineke & Thomas Wilkins conducting
Joshua Bergasse, director-choreographer
Renée Fleming, soprano
Ben Folds, vocalist
Punch Brothers
Keb Mo’
Christian McBride, bass

other artists TBA
Kennedy Center 50th Anniversary Celebration Concert
program TBA

$59-$119
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Sept. 16 (7:30 p.m.)
31st Street Park, 31st Street at the oceanfront, Virginia Beach
Virginia Symphony Orchestra
conductor TBA
“Symphony by the Sea”
John Stafford Smith: “The Star-Spangled Banner”
Glinka: “Russlan and Ludmilla” Overture
Adolphus Hailstork: “Celebration”
John Williams: “Wide Receiver”
Elgar: “Pomp and Circumstance” March No. 4
Meredith Willson: “The Music Man: Symphonic Impressions”
Verdi: “Aïda” – “Triumphal March”
Kool and the Gang: “Celebration”
Jimmy Lopez: “Fiesta: Four Pop Dances for Orchestra”
Tchaikovsky: “1812 Overture”
Sousa: “The Stars and Stripes Forever”

free
(757) 892-6366
http://virginiasymphony.org

Sept. 17 (7:30 p.m.)
Williamsburg Symphony Orchestra
Andres Lopera conducting

Johann Strauss II: “Die Fledermaus” Overture
Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor

Eun Joo Chung, piano
Brahms: Symphony No. 1 in C minor
Brahms: “Hungarian Dance” No. 5 in G minor

$10-$25 (access to online video-audio stream)
(757) 229-9857
http://williamsburgsymphony.org

Sept. 18 (3 p.m.)
Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library, First and Franklin streets
Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia:
Thalea String Quartet
Angela Lehman, narrator

“Our Places”
program TBA

free
(804) 304-6312
http://cmscva.org

Sept. 18 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Thomas Wilkins conducting

Peter Boyer: “Balance of Power” (premiere)
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor
Lang Lang, piano
Howard Hanson: Symphony No. 2 (“Romantic”)
$39-$139
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Sept. 19 (4 p.m.)
Seventh Street Christian Church, Grove and Malvern avenues, Richmond
Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia:
Thalea String Quartet
James Wilson, cello

Daniel Bernard Roumain: Quartet No. 5 (“Parks”)
Schubert: String Quintet in C major, D. 956

$5-$30
(804) 304-6312
http://cmscva.org

Sept. 20 (7:30 p.m.)
Kaufman Theater, Chrysler Museum of Art, 1 Memorial Place, Norfolk
Feldman Chamber Music Society:
Boston Trio
Haydn: Piano Trio in C major, Hob. XV:21
Fauré: Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 120
Brahms: Piano Trio in B major, Op. 8

$15-$25
(757) 552-1630
http://feldmanchambermusic.org

Sept. 21 (8 p.m.)
Williamsburg Library Theatre, 515 Scotland St.
Chamber Music Society of Williamsburg:
Adaskin String Trio
Sally Pinkas, piano

program TBA
$25
http://chambermusicwilliamsburg.org

Sept. 24 (7:30 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News
Sept. 25 (7:30 p.m.)
Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, Norfolk
Sept. 26 (2:30 p.m.)
Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St. Virginia Beach
Virginia Symphony Orchestra
Akiko Fujimoto conducting

Hindemith: “Ragtime”
Duke Ellington: “Harlem”
Ravel: Piano Concerto in G major
Gershwin: “Rhapsody in Blue”

Natasha Paremski, piano
$25-$81
(757) 892-6366
http://virginiasymphony.org

Sept. 25 (8 p.m.)
Sept. 26 (3 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Richmond Symphony
Valentina Peleggi conducting

Adolphus Hailstork: “Fanfare on ‘Amazing Grace’ ”
Florence Price: Piano Concerto in one movement

Louis Schwizgebel, piano
Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 in E minor (“From the New World”)
$10-$82 (live attendance); $30 (online video-audio stream, accessible from Sept. 29)
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

Sept. 25 (7 p.m.)
Kennedy Center, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Gianandrea Noseda conducting

Carlos Simon: “The Block”
Ginastera: “Estancia – Four Dances”
Rimsky-Korsakov: “Scheherazade”

$65-$99
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

Sept. 26 (3 p.m.)
River Road Church, Baptist, River and Ridge roads, Richmond
Christopher Martin, organ
works TBA by J.S. Bach, George Baker, Christian Friedrich Ruppe, Naji Hakim, Firmin Swinnen, John Knowles Paine
donation requested
(804) 288-1131
http://rrcb.org/concertseries