Review: Summer Chamberfest I

Adrian Pintea & Jeannette Jang, violins
Hyo Joo Uh, viola
Jason McComb, cello
Peter Spaar, double-bass
Ingrid Keller, piano
July 7, Dominion Energy Center

Louise Farrenc is one of the standout figures in the ongoing discovery of female composers of the past. Farrenc (1804-75), a French contemporary of Felix and Fanny Mendelssohn and Robert and Clara Schumann, was a prominent pianist, a composer of instrumental works in an era when opera and ballet music dominated the French soundscape, and the only woman to be appointed to the faculty of the Paris Conservatoire in the 19th century.

In the opening concert of the Richmond Symphony’s Summer Chamberfest, an ensemble of piano and strings played the earliest of the chamber works for which Farrenc was most widely celebrated, her Piano Quintet in A minor, Op. 30. Dating from 1839, the piece is scored for piano, violin, viola, cello and double-bass (the same instrumentation as that of Schubert’s “Trout” Quintet), and echoes many of the prevailing strains of European music of the time – especially the virtuosic, embellishment-rich piano writing of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (one of Farrenc’s teachers).

Pianist Ingrid Keller, appropriately, was the lead voice in this performance, but was a considerate leader, balancing her instrument’s often elaborate figurations with the rich, moody string parts in the big, rhapsodic opening and closing movements of the quintet. The five players realized echoes of Felix Mendelssohn’s quicksilver “fairy” music in the quintet’s scherzo, and of Beethoven in the anthem-like theme of the adagio.

Other echoes pervaded “Neo Soul,” the first string quartet of Damien Geter, a Chesterfield County-born singer (the bass-baritone soloist in the Richmond Symphony’s May performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony) and composer whose works blend European classical and African-American vernacular and popular musical traditions.

The three-movement “Neo Soul” is based thematically in Black popular song; expressively, though, the piece sounds like an American version of the folk-rooted but intensely personal writings of European “nationalist” romantics. I was reminded more than once of Bedrich Smetana’s First String Quartet (“In My Life”).

Violinists Adrian Pintea and Jeannette Jang, violist Hyo Joo Uh and cellist Jason McComb ably negotiated Geter’s contrasting grooves of romanticized, often eloquent melody over ostinato or cross-rhythmic bass lines, in an enticing introduction to Geter’s music.

There’s more to come: In 2025, Virginia Opera will introduce Geter’s and librettist Jessica Murphy Moo’s “Loving v. Virginia,” based on the lives of the couple whose 1967 Supreme Court case overturned prohibitions against interracial marriage, and Geter will serve as composer-in-residence with the Richmond Symphony (a co-commissioner of the opera).

Pintea, Jang, Uh and McComb rounded out this Chamberfest opener with the second movement of Maurice Ravel’s Quartet in F major, one of the best-known examples of pizzicato (plucked-string) writing in the quartet literature. While suitably animated in the pizzicato sections and moody in the central tune, the foursome’s collective sound was too heavy to qualify as idiomatically French-impressionist.

The Richmond Symphony’s Summer Chamberfest continues with violinist Alison Hall, flutist Shannon Vandzura, trumpeter Brian Strawley, trombonist Evan Williams and pianist Russell Wilson playing works by J.S. Bach, Missy Mazzoli and Eric Ewazen at 6:30 p.m. July 14 in Rhythm Hall of Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets. Tickets: $25-$30. Details: (800) 514-3849 (ETIX); http://www.richmondsymphony.com

Richmond Chamber Players’ Interlude 2022

After a pandemic-driven hiatus of two summers, the Richmond Chamber Players will resume their Interlude series of August concerts.

The ensemble has scheduled three concerts, at 3 p.m. Aug. 7, 14 and 21 at Bon Air Presbyterian Church, 9201 W. Huguenot Road.

Programming includes sonatas and ensemble works by Mozart, Schumann, Janáček, Barber and Shostakovich; a baroque program, largely of works by J.S. Bach, featuring harpsichordist Joanne Kong as a guest artist; and what the ensemble is billing as the modern premiere of “Wedding Music,” a suite for string quartet by the mid-20th-century US composer Randall Thompson.

Admission to the concerts requires proof of Covid-19 vaccination, and masks must be worn during performances.

Tickets are $80 for a three-concert subscription or $30 per concert. For more information, visit http://richmondchamberplayers.org

Dates, artists and programs:

Aug. 7
Janáček: Viola Sonata
Susy Yim, violin
John Walter, piano

Randall Thompson: “Wedding Music” for string quartet
Susy Yim & Catherine Cary, violins
Stephen Schmidt, viola
Neal Cary, cello

Schumann: Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44
John Walter, piano
Catherine Cary & Susy Yim, violins
Stephen Schmidt, viola
Neal Cary, cello

Aug. 14
Telemann: Fantasia No. 1 (solo-cello arrangement)
Emma Cary, cello
J.S. Bach: Flute Sonata in E major, BWV 1035
Shannon Valdzura, flute
Joanne Kong, harpsichord

P.D.Q. Bach: Sonata for viola four-hands
Molly Sharp & Stephen Schmidt, viola
Joanne Kong, harpsichord

J.S. Bach: “The Well-Tempered Clavier” (4 excerpts)
Joanne Kong, harpsichord
J.S. Bach: “Brandenburg” Concerto No. 6 in B flat major, BWV 1051 (chamber arrangement)
Molly Sharp & Stephen Schmidt, violas
Neal Cary, cello
Joanne Kong, harpsichord

Aug. 21
Shostakovich: Quartet No. 7 in F sharp minor, Op. 108
Susy Yim & Catherine Cary, violins
Stephen Schmidt, viola
Neal Cary, cello

Barber: Cello Sonata in C minor, Op. 6
Emma Cary, cello
Daniel Stipe, piano

Mozart: Piano Quartet in G minor, K. 478
Daniel Stipe, piano
Catherine Cary, violin
Stephen Schmidt, viola
Neal Cary, cello

Richard Taruskin (1945-2022)

Richard Taruskin, the eminent US musicologist known for his (literally) encyclopedic knowledge of European classical music and sharply phrased opinions, has died at 77.

Taruskin, a scholar of Russian music and viola da gamba player and chorusmaster in early music troupes in New York, spent most of his academic career at the University of California at Berkeley.

The author of a number of studies and essay collections, including the monumental “Stravinsky and the Russian Traditions” (1996), Taruskin was most widely known for writing the six-volume “Oxford History of Western Music,” a standard reference work since its publication in 2005. He also wrote for The New York Times, The New Republic and other mass media.

Known for his dust-ups with fellow musicologists, Taruskin was often characterized as a musical polemicist, with especially provocative views on the authenticity of historically informed performance practices and the sociopolitical role of composers, from Bach and Beethoven to Shostakovich and Prokofiev.

“Whether you judged him right or wrong, [Taruskin] made you feel that the art form truly mattered on the wider cultural stage,” Alex Ross, The New Yorker’s music critic, told William Robin in a Times obituary:

July calendar

Classical performances in and around Richmond, with selected events elsewhere in Virginia and the Washington area. Program information, provided by presenters, is updated as details become available. Adult ticket prices are listed; senior, student/youth, military, group and other discounts may be offered.

Each listing includes primary Covid-19 safety protocols for the event. Contact presenters and venues for updated, modified requirements.

July 1 (7:30 p.m.)
Palace Green, Palace Green and Prince George streets, Colonial Williamsburg
Virginia Symphony Orchestra
Eric Jacobsen conducting

“A Star-Spangled Symphony”
John Stafford Smith & Francis Scott Key: “The Star-Spangled Banner”
Morton Gould: “American Salute”
John Williams: “The Patriot”
trad.: “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”
(Margaret Bonds arrangement)
trad.: “This Little Light of Mine” (Hale Smith arrangement)
Leonard Cohen: “Hallelujah” (David Kahne arrangement)
Simone Paulwell, soprano
Louis Moreau Gottschalk: Symphony No. 2 (“Romantique; “Montevideo”) – II: Presto – maestoso
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 in A major – IV: Allegro con brio
Samuel A. Ward & Katharine Lee Bates: “America the Beautiful”
(Carmen Dragon arrangement)
free
masks optional
(757) 892-6366
http://virginiasymphony.org

July 1 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra Pops
Henry Panion conducting
India.Arie, guest star

“BLACK GIRLS ROCK! FEST”
$49-$139
masks required
(800) 444-1324
http://kennedy-center.org

July 4 (7:30 p.m.)
Dogwood Dell Amphitheater, Byrd Park, Richmond
Richmond Concert Band
Mark Poland directing

Fourth of July Celebration
program TBA

free
masks optional
(804) 646-1437
http://richmondconcertband.org

July 4 (8 p.m.)
Meadow Farm Museum at Crump Park, 3400 Mountain Road, Glen Allen
Richmond Symphony
Chia-Hsuan Lin conducting
No BS! Brass Band

“Red, White and Lights 2022”
patriotic & pops program TBA

free
masks optional
(804) 652-1455
http://henrico.us/places/meadow-farm

July 7 (6:30 p.m.)
Rhythm Hall, Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Richmond Symphony Summer Series:
Adrian Pintea & Jeannette Jang, violins
HyoJoo Uh, viola
Jason McComb, cello
Peter Spaar, double-bass
Ingrid Keller, piano

Damien Geter: “Neo-Soul”
Louise Farrenc: Piano Quintet No. 1
Ravel: Quartet in F major – II: Assez vif – très rythmé

$25-$30
masks required
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

July 7 (7 p.m.)
July 8 (7 p.m.)
July 9 (7 p.m.)
July 10 (2 p.m.)
Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Charlottesville
Charlottesville Opera
Michael Slon conducting

Rodgers & Hammerstein: “The Sound of Music”
Maria Valdes (Maria)
Branch Fields (Captain von Trapp)
Claudia Chapa (Mother Abbess)

other cast members TBA
Cara Consilvio, stage director
in English
$25-$75
masks optional
(434) 979-1333
http://charlottesvilleopera.org

July 8 (7:30 p.m.)
The Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Road, Vienna
Kate Lindsey, mezzo-soprano
Justina Lee, piano

Schumann: “Frauenliebe und Leben”
Fauré: “La chanson d’Ève”

$42
masks required
(703) 255-1868
http://wolftrap.org

July 9 (7:30 p.m.)
July 10 (3 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Wintergreen Festival Orchestra
Erin Freeman conducting

Jessie Montgomery: “Starburst”
Stravinsky: Concerto in E flat major (“Dumbarton Oaks”)
Wagner: “Siegfried Idyll”
Saint-Saëns: “Carnival of the Animals”

pianists TBA
$48
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 9 (5 p.m.)
Herter Hall, Garth Newel Music Center, 403 Garth Newel Lane, Hot Springs
Garth Newel Piano Quartet
Frank Bridge: “Phantasy” Quartet
Schumann: Piano Quartet in E flat major, Op. 47

$25 (concert); $92 (concert & dinner)
masks recommended
(540) 839-5018
http://garthnewel.org

July 10 (2 p.m.)
July 16 (5 p.m.)
Herter Hall, Garth Newel Music Center, 403 Garth Newel Lane, Hot Springs
Wanchi Huang & Teresa Ling, violins
Fitz Gary, viola
Isaac Melamed, cello

William Grant Still: “Lyric Quartet”
Astor Piazzolla: “Four for Tango”
Dvořák: Quartet in F major, Op. 96 (“American”)

$25 (concert); $92 (concert & dinner)
masks recommended
(540) 839-5018
http://garthnewel.org

July 13 (7:30 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Wintergreen Festival Artists
Amy Beach: “Suite Founded upon Old Irish Melodies” for 2 pianos
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor: Fantasiestücke, Op. 5, for string quartet
Peter Hope: “Four Sketches” for oboe, bassoon & piano
Vaughan Williams: Quintet in D major for clarinet, horn, violin, cello & piano
$38
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 14 (6:30 p.m.)
Rhythm Hall, Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Richmond Symphony Summer Series:
Alison Hall, violin
Shannon Vandzura, flute
Brian Strawley, trumpet
Evan Williams, trombone
Russell Wilson, piano

J.S. Bach: Partita No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004, for solo violin
Missy Mazzoli: work TBA
Eric Ewazen: Trumpet Trio

$25-$30
masks required
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

July 14 (7:30 p.m.)
Neptune’s Park, Atlantic Avenue at 31st Street, Vurginia Beach
Virginia Symphony Orchestra
conductor TBA
“Symphony by the Sea”
program TBA

free
masks optional
(757) 892-6366
http://virginiasymphony.org

July 15 (8 p.m.)
Dogwood Dell Amphitheater, Byrd Park, Richmond
Capitol Opera Richmond
Latin Ballet of Virginia
COR Singers

“A Grand Night for Singing”
Monteverdi: “The Coronation of Poppea”
(excerpts)
other works TBA
free
masks optional
(804) 646-1437
http://capitoloperarichmond.com

July 15 (8 p.m.)
Filene Center, Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna
Wolf Trap Opera
National Symphony Orchestra
Roberto Kalb conducting

Verdi: “La Traviata”
Chanáe Curtis (Violetta)
Richard Trey Smagur (Alfredo Germont)
Kidon Choi (Giorgio Germont)
Ruby Dibble (Flora Bervoix)
Saane Halaholo (Annina)
Matthew Goodheart (Gaston)
Jin Yung David Kahng (Baron Douphol)
Patrick Wilhelm (Marquis D’Obigny)
Dylan Gregg (Doctor Grenvil)
Hayden Smith (Joseph)
Thomas Petrushka (Messenger)
Emma Griffin, stage director

in Italian, English captions
$27-$77
masks recommended
(703) 255-1868
http://wolftrap.org

July 16 (3 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Richmond Symphony Chamber Chorus
Wintergreen Sing with US! Chorus
Erin Freeman directing

Orff: “Carmina burana” (chamber version) (excerpts)
Duke Ellington: “Come Sunday”
Caroline Shaw: “And the Swallow”
Ken Burton: “Rest”
Jake Runestad: “A Silence Haunts Me”
trad.: “Deep River”
(Moses Hogan arrangement)
trad.: “I’m Gonna Sing” (Moses Hogan arrangement)
trad.: “Heavenly Home” (Shawn Kirchner arrangement)
$38
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 16 (7:30 p.m.)
July 17 (3 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Wintergreen Festival Orchestra
Andrew Grams conducting

Vivaldi: “The Four Seasons” – III: “Autumn”
Max Richter: “Recomposing ‘The Four Seasons’ ” – “Winter”
Astor Piazzolla: “Primavera Porteña” (“Buenos Aires Spring”)
Philip Glass: “The American Four Seasons” – Violin Concerto No. 2

violinists TBA
Beethoven: Symphony No. 2 in D major
$48
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 17 (7 p.m.)
Gallery5, 200 W. Marshall St., Richmond
Classical Revolution RVA:
artists TBA
program TBA
donation requested
masks recommended
(804) 678-8863
http://classicalrevolutionrva.com/events

July 17 (2 p.m.)
Herter Hall, Garth Newel Music Center, 403 Garth Newel Lane, Hot Springs
Jeannette Fang, piano
“Folk Songs from Afar”
Bartók: Sonata, Sz. 80
Amy Beach: “Variations on Balkan Themes,” Op. 60
Karen Tanaka: “Techno Etudes II”

$25 (concert); $70 (dinner)
masks recommended
(540) 839-5018
http://garthnewel.org

July 20 (7:30 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Heather Johnson, mezzo-soprano
Wintergreen Festival Artists

Kari Juusela: “Apollo & Daphne” for solo cello
Einojuhani Rautavaara: “Dithyrambos”
Daron Hagen: “Three Whitman Fragments”
Laura Valborg Aulin: Sonata in G minor for piano & violin
Grieg: “Haugtussa” (“The Mountain Voice”), Op. 67,
for voice & string quartet
$38
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 21 (6:30 p.m.)
Rhythm Hall, Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Richmond Symphony Summer Series:
Richmond Symphony Woodwind Quintet:
Mary Boodell, flute
David Garcia, oboe
David Lemelin, clarinet
Thomas Schneider, bassoon
Dominic Rotella, French horn

program TBA
$25-$30
masks required
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

July 22 (7:30 p.m.)
July 24 (2 p.m.)
Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Charlottesville
Charlottesville Opera
Lawrence Loh conducting

Léhar: “The Merry Widow”
Caroline Worra (Hanna Glawari)
Richard Troxell (Count Danilo)
David Kaverman (Njegus)
Joe Barron (Baron Zeta)
Katherine Henly (Valencienne)
Andrew Stenson (Camille)
Stephanie Harvey, stage director

in English
$25-$75
masks optional
(434) 979-1333
http://www.charlottesvilleopera.org

July 22 (7:30 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Wintergreen Festival Artists
Shostakovich: Concertino, Op. 94, for 2 pianos
4 animated short films by the 2022 LEAD composers
Orson Welles’ “Too Much Johnson,” with score by Daron Hagen (premiere)
$48
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 22 (8 p.m.)
July 23 (8 p.m.)
Filene Center, Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna
National Symphony Orchestra Pops
Steven Reineke conducting

“Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince,” film with live orchestral accompaniment
$37-$67
masks recommended
(703) 255-1868
http://wolftrap.org

July 23 (7:30 p.m.)
July 24 (3 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Wintergreen Festival Orchestra
Michelle Merrill conducting

Jessie Montgomery: “Strum”
Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No. 1 in C minor

Sean Chen, piano
Dave Vonderheide, trumpet

Mozart: Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550
$48
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 23 (5 p.m.)
Herter Hall, Garth Newel Music Center, 403 Garth Newel Lane, Hot Springs
Garth Newel Piano Quartet
Emerging Artists Fellows

Moritz Moszkowski: Suite for 2 violins & piano
Brahms: String Sextet in B flat major, Op. 18

$25 (concert); $92 (dinner)
masks recommended
(540) 839-5018
http://garthnewel.org

July 24 (4 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
VCU Community Guitar Ensemble
program TBA
free
masks recommended
(804) 828-1169
http://arts.vcu.edu/events

July 24 (2 p.m.)
Herter Hall, Garth Newel Music Center, 403 Garth Newel Lane, Hot Springs
Garth Newel Piano Quartet
Emerging Artists Fellows

Shostakovich: Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 57
Dohnányi: Piano Quintet in C minor, Op. 1

$25 (concert); $53 (picnic)
masks recommended
(540) 839-5018
http://garthnewel.org

July 24 (8 p.m.)
Filene Center, Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna
Silk Road Ensemble
Rhiannon Giddens directing

“Phoenix Rising”
program TBA

$32-$127
masks recommended
(703) 255-1868
http://wolftrap.org

July 26 (7:30 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Heather Johnson, mezzo-soprano
Nicole Joseph, soprano
Jeffrey Picón, tenor
Michael Dean, bass-baritone
Kathy Kelly, piano

4 songs by 2022 LEAD composers
Brahms: “Liebeslieder-Walzer,” Op. 52
Brahms: “Neues Liebeslieder,” Op. 65

$38
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 27 (7:30 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Wintergreen Festival Artists
Albéniz: works TBA (brass quintet arrangements)
Pauline Viardot-Garcia: Sonatine in A minor for violin & piano
Eurico Carrapatoso: “Cinco Miniaturas” for woodwind quintet
Turina: Piano Quintet in A minor, Op. 67
$38
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 28 (6:30 p.m.)
Rhythm Hall, Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Richmond Symphony Summer Chamberfest:
Daisuke Yamamoto & Susy Yim, violins
HyoJoo Uh & Stephen Schmidt, violas
Ryan Lannan, cello

Mozart: String Quintet in C major, K. 515
Kenji Bunch: “String Circle”

$25-$30
masks required
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

July 28 (7:30 p.m.)
Neptune’s Park, Atlantic Avenue at 31st Street, Vurginia Beach
Virginia Symphony Orchestra
conductor TBA
“Symphony by the Sea”
program TBA

free
masks optional
(757) 892-6366
http://virginiasymphony.org

July 28 (7:30 p.m.)
Dunlop Pavilion, Wintergreen Resort, Nelson County
Wintergreen Music Festival:
Wintergreen Festival Artists
“The Great Big Concert”
pieces for solo clarinet & cello by 2022 LEAD composers
Brahms: Symphony No. 2 in D major (Iain Farrington arrangement)
performances by 2022 LEAD vocalists with orchestra
orchestra professional & LEAD side-by-side performance TBA
$38
masks optional
(434) 361-0541
http://wintergreen-music.org/events

July 29 (8 p.m.)
Filene Center, Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna
National Symphony Orchestra
Emil de Cou conducting

“Star Wars: the Empire Strikes Back,” film with live orchestral accompaniment
$42-$87
masks recommended
(703) 255-1868
http://wolftrap.org

July 30 (8 p.m.)
Shrine Mont Pavilion, Orkney Springs
Shenandoah Valley Music Festival:
Richmond Symphony
conductor TBA
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor (“Choral”)
soloists TBA
Shenandoah Valley Choral Society
$63-$73
masks optional
(540) 459-3396
http://musicfest.org

July 30 (5 p.m.)
Herter Hall, Garth Newel Music Center, 403 Garth Newel Lane, Hot Springs
Garth Newel Piano Quartet
Bohdan Sinchenko: “Exsistentia” (premiere)
Dvořák: Piano Quartet in E flat major, Op. 87
$25 (concert); $92 (dinner)
masks recommended
(540) 839-5018http://garthnewel.org

July 31 (2 p.m.)
Herter Hall, Garth Newel Music Center, 403 Garth Newel Lane, Hot Springs
Emerging Artists Fellows
Prokofiev: Sonata in C major, Op. 56, for 2 violins
Mozart: Piano Quartet in G minor, K. 478
$25 (concert); $53 (picnic)
masks recommended
(540) 839-5018
http://garthnewel.org

Aug. 2 (7:30 p.m.)
Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Charlottesville
Charlottesville Band
Steve Layman directing

100th Anniversary Concert
program TBA

free
masks optional
(434) 979-1333
http://cvilleband.org

Aug. 3 (7 p.m.)
Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church, 1627 Monument Ave., Richmond
August Musicales:
Trio Niche
program TBA
donation requested
masks recommended
(804) 359-2463
http://www.grace-covenant.org

Aug. 5 ( 8 p.m.)
Filene Center, Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna
National Symphony Orchestra
Ruth Reinhardt conducting

Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto in D major
Gil Shaham, violin
Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 in E minor (“From the New World”)
$27-$82
masks recommended
(703) 255-1868
http://wolftrap.org

Aug. 6 (5 p.m.)
Herter Hall, Garth Newel Music Center, 403 Garth Newel Lane, Hot Springs
Parker Quartet
Jeannette Fang, piano

Beethoven: Quartet in F major, Op. 18, No. 1
Takemitsu: “A Way A Lone”
Brahms: Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34

$25 (concert); $92 (concert & dinner)
masks recommended
(540) 839-5018
http://garthnewel.org

Met’s Gelb at war (and not just with Putin)

Peter Gelb, general manager of New York’s Metropolitan Opera, was interviewed recently by Jeffrey Arlo Brown for Van Magazine. The most widely remarked-upon portion of their conversation was Gelb’s acknowledgment that the Met is “indirectly” at war with Vladimir Putin’s Russia and with Putin-friendly or -adjacent Russian artists, most notably Anna Netrebko, the Russian soprano who had been a Met mainstay for two decades.

“We may not say we’re at war with them, but we are at war with them,” Gelb said, calling Russia’s invasion “an action to annihilate a civilization, the whole people of Ukraine.”

Three less geopolitical points of interest from the interview:

– About his decision to furlough the company’s orchestra, chorus and stagehands during the pandemic shutdown, causing financial and professional hardship for many: “I know that it was very controversial what I did. My goal was to keep the Met alive. ”

– Gelb’s advocacy of more diverse programming, especially contemporary operas and works by composers of color: “[M]ore assertive action needed to be taken to emphasize new and diverse work. . . . Clearly, it’s right, but it’s also a question of opera’s survival. If we don’t open the world of opera up to a broader audience, it will not survive. We must do this.”

– His aversion to Regieoper (directors’ opera), in which stagings depart from or conflict with composers’ and librettists’ intentions: “[P]art of my responsibility is hiring directors who honor the narratives of the operas that they’re producing. . . . The story has to be clearly told.”

The full interview:

Title Change

UR Modlin Center 2022-23

The Kronos Quartet and a pairing of the ensembles Third Coast Percussion and Flutronix are among the classical attractions in a 2022-23 season focusing on contemporary and multicultural music and other art forms at the University of Richmond’s Modlin Arts Center.

More “traditional” classical attractions in the Modlin Center’s roster of visiting artists include the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, soprano Susanna Phillips and Anthony McGill, the New York Philharmonic’s principal clarinetist.

The full series will feature multicultural and world-music musicians ranging from the Cherokee Nation writer and performer Delanna Studi; the Danish folk-contemporary ensemble Dreamer’s Circus; the duo of singer Rhiannon Giddens and multi-instrumentalist Francesco Turrisi; Leyla McCalla, a New Orleans-based cellist of Haitian ancestry, and Kayhan Kalhor, who plays kamancheh, the traditional Persian spike fiddle.

Dance attractions include a modern-dance mainstay, the Mark Morris Dance Group, along with contemporary tap dancer Michelle Dorrance and her troupe, Step Afrika! and Ashwini Ramaswamy in a contemporary take on the traditional Hindu ceremony honoring ancestors.

Jazz performers in the series include the Aaron Diehl Trio, pianist Fred Hersch with singer Esperanza Spalding, saxophonist Joshua Redman and his trio, and a group led by bassist Christian McBride.

In addition to visiting artists, the Modlin Center season will feature soloists and ensembles from UR’s music, theater and dance departments.

For the ticketed Modlin Arts Presents series, “choose your own” subscription packages are available, with a 20 percent discount on purchases of tickets for four or more attractions.

To obtain a 2022-23 season brochure and more information, call the Modlin Center box office at (804) 289-8980 or visit http://modlin.richmond.edu

The Modlin Center’s 2022-23 classical series:

MODLIN ARTS PRESENTS

All concerts at 7:30 p.m. in Camp Concert Hall unless listed otherwise. Tickets: $35.

Oct. 27 – Susanna Phillips, soprano; Craig Terry, piano. Program TBA.

Jan. 21 – Kronos Quartet; vocal ensemble TBA; Nicky Finney, narrator; Valérie Sainte-Agathe conducting. Michael Abels: “A War with Ourselves.”

Feb. 5 (3 p.m.) – Anthony McGill, clarinet; Gloria Chien, piano. Telemann: fantasias for solo clarinet; Jessie Montgomery: “Peace;” Brahms: Clarinet Sonata in F minor, Op. 120, No. 1; Deng Yu-Hsien: “Pining for the Spring Breeze” (Stephen Hough arrangement); James Lee III: “Ad Anah?” Weber: Grand Duo Concertant.

Feb. 19 – Third Coast Percussion & Flutronix. Program TBA.

Feb. 22 – Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Beethoven: Piano Trio in E flat major, Op. 1, No. 1; Dohnányi: Serenade for violin, viola & cello; Brahms: Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25.

MUSIC DEPARTMENT CONCERTS

All concerts in Camp Concert Hall unless listed otherwise. Programs TBA. Free admission.

Sept. 18 (3 p.m.) – Joanne Kong, harpsichord.

Sept. 23 (7:30 p.m.) – various artists TBA. “Family Weekend Concert.”

Oct. 30 (3 p.m.) – UR Schola Cantorum & Women’s Chorale, Jeffrey Riehl & David Pedersen directing.

Nov. 4-5 (various times) various artists TBA. Third Practice Electroacoustic Music Festival.

Nov. 21 (7:30 p.m.) – UR Wind Ensemble, Steven Barton directing.

Nov. 28 (7:30 p.m.) – UR Chamber Ensembles, Joanne Kong directing.

Nov. 30 (7:30 p.m.) – UR Symphony Orchestra, Alexander Kordzaia conducting.

Dec. 4 (5 & 8 p.m., Cannon Memorial Chapel) – UR Schola Cantorum & Women’s Chorale, Jeffrey Riehl & David Pedersen directing. 49th annual Festival of Lessons and Carols.

Feb. 1 (7:30 p.m.) – Richard Becker, piano.

March 19 (3 p.m.) – Doris Wylee-Becker, piano.

March 27 (7:30 p.m., Cannon Memorial Chapel) – Bruce Stevens, organ.

April 10 (7:30 p.m.) – UR Wind Ensemble, Steven Barton directing.

April 16 (3 p.m.) – UR Schola Cantorum & Women’s Chorale, Jeffrey Riehl & David Pedersen directing.

April 17 (7:30 p.m.) – UR Chamber Ensembles, Joanne Kong directing.

Tuesday Evening Concerts 2022-23

Two leading string quartets, the Takács and the Jerusalem, New York’s Orpheus Chamber Orchestra with pianist Alessio Bax, and a stop on the 50th-anniversary tour of Britain’s Tallis Scholars highlight the 2022-23 lineup of the Tuesday Evening Concerts in Charlottesville.

Staged since 1948, the Tuesday Evening Concerts are among the premier chamber-music series in the region.

Subscriptions to the seven-concert season are $65 to $225; single tickets, $12 to $39. For purchases and details, call (434) 244-9505 or visit http://tecs.org

All concerts will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the University of Virginia’s Old Cabell Hall.

Dates, artists and programs:

Oct. 11 – Alexander Malofeev, piano. Beethoven: Sonata in C sharp minor, Op. 27, No. 2 (“Moonlight”); Beethoven: Sonata in D minor, Op. 31, No. 2 (“Tempest”); Medtner: Sonata in G minor, Op. 22; Rachmaninoff: Études-tableaux, Op. 33.

Oct. 25 – Takács Quartet. Fanny Mendelssohn: Quartet in E flat major; Bartók: Quartet No. 6; Dvořák: Quartet in G major, Op. 106.

Nov. 29 – Yevgeny Kutik, violin; Anna Polonsky, piano. Brahms: Violin Sonata in A major, Op. 100; Milhaud: “Le Boeuf sur le toit;” Richard Strauss: Violin Sonata in E flat major, Op. 18; Ravel: “Tzigane.”

Feb. 21 – Orpheus Chamber Orchestra; Alessio Bax, piano. Respighi: “Ancient Airs and Dances” Suite No. 3; Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor; Dvořák: Serenade in E major, Op. 22.

March 28 – Nicola Benedetti, violin; Leonard Elschenbroich, cello; Alexei Grynyuk, piano. Schubert: Piano Trio in E flat major, D. 929; Tchaikovsky: Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 50 (“In Memory of a Great Artist”).

April 11 – The Tallis Scholars, Peter Phillips directing. Orlando Gibbons: “O Clap Your Hands;” Thomas Tallis: “Suscipe quaeso;” Nico Muhly: “Rough Notes;” William Byrd: “Tribue domine;” Giovanni Palestrina: “Tu es Petrus;” John Rutter: “Hymn to the Creator of Light;” Nicolas Gombert: “Lugebat David;” Josequin des Prez: “Absilon fili mi;” Arvo Pärt: “Which was the son of . . . ”

April 25 – Jerusalem Quartet. Mendelssohn: Quartet E minor, Op. 44, No. 2; Webern: “Langsamer Satz;” Tchaikovsky: Quartet in D major, Op. 11.

San Antonio Symphony shuts down

The San Antonio Symphony, citing an impasse in negotiations with its musicians, has shut down.

The Texas orchestra’s board issued a statement saying that the musicians’ union representatives “made it clear there is no prospect of the resumption of negotiations, absent the [b]oard agreeing to a budget that is millions of dollars in excess of what the Symphony can afford. The absence of a labor contract has effectively forced the Symphony to shutter its operations.”

“During negotiations that began in 2021, the musicians and the orchestra management made multiple proposals to continue the 2021-2022 season with concessions including a reduced schedule and wage reductions,” San Antonio Reports’ Nicholas Frank reports. “What ended negotiations was the musicians’ refusal to accept a two-tier wage schedule imposed on them by management in September, which resulted in a strike that continued until the season was canceled in May.”

The orchestra’s former music director, Sebastian Lang-Lessing, who was dismissed as music director emeritus after conducting concerts by the striking musicians, called for the orchestra board to resign. “If a board resigns, it gives other people the the possibility to carry on the mission,” he told Frank. “Instead of admitting failure, they now claim that the musicians – because of their lack of willingness to negotiate on a plan that doesn’t work – are to be blamed.”

Mary Ellen Goree, the orchestra’s principal second violinist and union spokesperson, told Texas Public Radio that the independent Musicians Performance Fund is planning to stage concerts in the fall and “hinted that a new organization to run the symphony may be in the works.”

The San Antonio Symphony had struggled financially and organizationally in recent decades. Much of its 1987-88 season was canceled, and after filing for bankruptcy, the orchestra canceled its 2003-04 season. An unsuccessful reorganization led it to call off much of its 2017-18 season.

Frank’s report on the dissolution of the orchestra:

Board dissolves San Antonio Symphony, will file for bankruptcy

Concertgebouw taps Klaus Mäkelä

Updated

Klaus Mäkelä, the 26-year-old Finn who in the past few years has skyrocketed to star status among conductors, has been tapped as the next artistic leader of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam.

Mäkelä, who has led the Oslo Philharmonic since 2020 and will assume direction of Orchestre de Paris in the 2022-23 season, will gradually take charge of the Concertgebouw, becoming artistic partner this fall and chief conductor in 2027.

He fills a vacancy left when the Concertgebouw dismissed Daniele Gatti in 2018 after allegations of sexual misconduct, which Gatti has denied.

The New York Times’ Joshua Barone reports on Mäkelä’s Amsterdam appointment:

UPDATE (June 12): The Concertgebouw’s principal double-bassist, Dominic Seldis, interviews Mäkelä: