Symphony Summer ChamberFest 2021

The Richmond Symphony will present four concerts in its Summer ChamberFest at 6:30 p.m. Thursdays, July 8 through 29, in the Gottwald Playhouse of Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets.

Programs include works by Mozart, Mendelssohn, Ravel, Poulenc and Piazzolla, alongside rarely heard works by Joseph Boulogne (Chevalier de Saint-Georges) and Rebecca Clarke and contemporary pieces by Caroline Shaw and Juan Pablo Contreras.

Series tickets are $75, single tickets $25 per concert. For more information, call the symphony’s patron services office at (804) 788-1212 or visit http://www.richmondsymphony.com

Summer ChamberFest artists and programs:

July 8 – David Lemelin, clarinet; Hyojoo Uh, viola; Russell Wilson, piano. Mozart: Clarinet Trio in E flat major, K. 498 (“Kegelstatt”); Ravel: “Menuet antique;” Rebecca Clarke: Prelude, Allegro and Pastorale.

July 15 – Adrian Pintea & Stacy Matthews, violins; Stephen Schmidt, viola; Jason McComb, cello. Joseph Boulogne (Chevalier de Saint-Georges): Quartet No. 5 in G minor; Mendelssohn: Quartet No. 3 in D major, Op. 44; Caroline Shaw: Entr’acte.

July 22 – Anthony Limoncelli, trumpet; Dominic Rotella, French horn; Evan Williams, trombone. Works TBA by Mozart, Poulenc, others.

July 29 – Ellen Cockerham Riccio, violin; Daniel Stipe, piano. Astor Piazzolla: “Cuatro Estaciones Porteñas” (The Four Season of Buenos Aires”); Juan Pablo Contreras: “Diálogos.”

Virginia Symphony taps Eric Jacobsen

Eric Jacobsen, the cellist and conductor best-known as co-founder and artistic director of The Knights, has been named music director of the Virginia Symphony Orchestra.

He succeeds JoAnn Falletta, who last summer concluded her 29-year-tenure with the Hampton Roads-based orchestra. She is now the VSO’s music director laureate.

Jacobsen and his brother, violinist Colin Jacobsen, founded The Knights in the late 1990s as a collective of New York-based musicians, initially playing chamber music. The ensemble evolved into an orchestra whose programs range from standard classical repertory to contemporary and culture-crossing music.

Jacobsen has been music director of the Orlando Philharmonic since 2015, and has been principal conductor of the Greater Bridgeport (CN) Symphony and artistic partner of the Northwest Sinfonietta of Seattle since 2014. He also has guest-conducted a number of US and European orchestras.

He is the cellist of Brooklyn Rider, a string quartet specializing in contemporary and avant-garde music, and has performed with the Silk Road Ensemble, an ensemble founded by Yo-Yo Ma to explore non-Western art-music.

The 38-year-old cellist-conductor is the son of Edmond Jacobsen, a violinist who formerly played in New York’s Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, and flutist Ivy Jacobsen. He is a graduate of the Juilliard School. He is married to the folk singer Aoife O’Donovan.

“Eric’s innovative vision, musical curiosity, and boundless energy are in perfect alignment with this moment, and with the VSO’s commitment to serve the entire community in new and exciting ways,” Karen M. Philion, president and CEO of the orchestra, said in a statement announcing Jacobsen’s appointment.

When he conducted the VSO in March 2020, “it wasn’t just me loving this orchestra, it was going in both directions. There was a symbiotic thing going on,” Jacobsen told Amy Poulter of The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk:

http://www.pilotonline.com/entertainment/arts/vp-db-virginia-symphony-orchestra-music-director-eric-jacobsen-060321-20210602-633randotjd4tk4tizxoqlhsde-story.html

June calendar

A stumble on the way to revival of live classical music in Richmond: Two leading organizations have scheduled performances at the same time on the same day.

The Richmond Symphony with its associate conductor, Chia-Hsuan Lin, perform in a concert at 4 p.m. June 13 marking the opening of the Baxter Perkinson Center for the Arts, 11801 Centre St. in Chester. The program includes Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 in A major, the “Sonata da Chiesa” by Virginia composer Adolphus Hailstork and Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro” Overture. Tickets: $25 (limited seating, masks required in the hall). Details: (800) 514-3849 (ETIX); http://www.richmondsymphony.com . . . Assistant Conductor Daniel Myssyk leads the orchestra in a pops concert at 8 p.m. June 5 at Pocahontas State Park, 10301 State Park Road in Chesterfield County. Tickets: $10 (plus parking fee). Health protocols and ticket information: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/pocahontas-premieres-the-richmond-symphony-tickets-118391130057 . . . Several symphony ensembles perform along a one-mile walking route in “Mile of Music,” a free event from 2 to 4 p.m. June 12 at Forest Hill Park, 4021 Forest Hill Ave.

The Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia concludes its current season with “Weather the Storm,” a program of Vivaldi’s “The Four Seasons” and a new work commissioned by the society, Kevin Alexander Day’s “Surgent,” at 4 p.m. June 13 at Trinity Lutheran Church, 2315 N. Parham Road. Performers include violinists Nicholas DiEugenio, Johnny Gandelsman and Natalie Rose Kress; violist Dana Kelley; cellist James Wilson; double-bassist Jonathan Colbert; traverso flutist Mary Boodell; and harpsichordist Carsten Schmidt. Tickets: $5-$30 (limited seating, health protocols in effect). Details: (804) 304-6312; http://cmscva.org

The Virginia Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Paul Bhasin, performs in “Symphony under the Stars,” a free concert at 8 p.m. June 5 in Woodville Park, 3904 Woodville Park Road in Gloucester. . . . Virginia Arts Festival performances by the orchestra with JoAnn Falletta, the VSO’s music director laureate, and pianist Olga Kern in all-Beethoven program, June 11-13 at various Hampton Roads venues, are sold out. . . . In another Virginia Arts Festival event, a string ensemble from the orchestra plays in a “sensory friendly” audience-participatory concert with members of Tidewater Music Therapy, at 11 a.m. June 12 at Bank Street Stage, Bank and East Charlotte streets in Norfolk. Tickets: $12. . . . Erin Freeman conducts the orchestra, with guest stars Classical Mystery Tour, a Beatles tribute band, 7:30 p.m. June 15 at Ferguson Arts Center of Christopher Newport University in Newport News, and 7:30 p.m. June 16 at Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard in Norfolk. Tickets: $35. . . . Daniel Matsukawa conducts, with Michael Byerly, the VSO’s principal clarinetist as featured soloist, in a program of Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto in A major, K. 622, and Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony, at 7:30 p.m. June 23 at Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St. in Virginia Beach, 7:30 p.m. June 24 at Chrysler Hall in Norfolk, and 7:30 p.m. June 25 at Ferguson Arts Center in Newport News. Tickets: $35. Details: (757) 892-6366; http://virginiasymphony.org

Other Virginia Arts Festival classical events: Pianist Olga Kern, the Ambrosia Quartet, flutist Debra Wendells Cross, oboist Sherie Lake Aguirre, harpist Barbara Chapman, violist Beverly Kane Baker and double-bassist Christopher White, play works by Glinka, Vaughan Williams, Philippe Gaubert and others at 7:30 p.m. June 8 on the Bank Street stage in Norfolk. Tickets: $70-$140. . . . JoAnn Falletta conducts the Virginia Arts Festival Chamber Players, with reciters Hila Plitmann and Fred Child, in William Walton’s “Façade,” at 7:30 p.m. June 14 at Goode Arts Center of Virginia Wesleyan University in Virginia Beach. Tickets: $10-$45. Details: (757) 282-2822; http://vafest.org

Gianandrea Noseda, music director of the National Symphony Orchestra, conducts a program to be announced featuring NSO members – clarinetist Lin Ma, bassoonist Sue Heineman and double-bassist Robert Oppelt – at 7 p.m. June 3 in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall in Washington. Tickets: $89. Details: (800) 444-1324; http://kennedy-center.org

Menuhin Competition winners named

María Dueñas, an 18-year-old Spaniard who studies with Boris Kuschnir at the University of Music and Performing Arts Graz and the Music and Arts University of the City of Vienna, has been named senior first prize-winner of the 2021 Yehudi Menuhin Competition for young violinists, staged this year in Richmond.

Keila Wakao, a 15-year-old resident of Chestnut Hill, MA, who studies with Donald Weilerstein and Soovin Kim at New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, was named junior first prize-winner of the competition.

Dueñas wins $20,000 plus a two-year loan of a Stradivarius violin from the collection of Jonathan Moulds and a bow made by Christophe Landon. Wakao wins $10,000 and a two-year loan of an antique Italian instrument, sponsored by Florian Leonhard Fine Violins London & New York. Wakao also won the Junior Composer Award, sponsored by the Richard S. Reynolds Foundation.

The two prize-winners will perform with the Richmond Symphony in the competition’s Gala Presentation at 5 p.m. (EDT) May 23, viewable online via http://2021.menuhincompetition.org/ The concert also will feature Angelo Xiang Yu, a winner in the 2010 Menuhin Competition, playing “Bound Away,” a work by Richmond-bred composer Mason Bates written for contestants to play in this year’s competition.

The Menuhin, which since its founding in 1983 has become the leading international competition for young violinists (22 and younger), was to have been staged in Richmond in 2020, but was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. Continued safety concerns and travel restrictions led to the rescheduled competition being run primarily online.

Most competition rounds and concerts can be seen and heard on the competition’s YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/MenuhinCompetition

Other senior prize-winners:

– Second prize: Simon Zhu, a 20-year-old German studying at the Julius-Stern-Institut – Universität der Künste (University of the Arts) in Berlin.

– Third prize: Hana Chang, 18, a student at Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia.

– Fourth prize: Karisa Chiu, 21, a Curtis student from Illinois.

Joint Composer Award: Chiu and Emily Shehi, 22, a Curtis student and Philadelphia resident.

Other junior prize-winners:

Second prize: Edward Walton, 15, a student at the Australian National Academy of Music in Melbourne.

Third prize: Hannah Wan Ching Tam, 15, from Hong Kong, a student of Ida Kavafian at Curtis.

– Fourth prize: Kento Hong, 14, a student of Ann Setzer in the Pre-College Division of the Juilliard School of Music in New York.

– Fifth prize: Boha Moon, 15, an alumna of the Korea National Institute for the Gifted in Arts who now studies with Josef Špaček in Prague.

Jurors of this year’s Menuhin Competition were Pamela Frank, chair; Joji Hattori, vice chair; and Noah Bendix-Balgley, Aaron Dworkin, Alf Richard Kraggerud, Piers Lane, Soyoung Yoon, Angelo Xiang Yu and Richmond Symphony Music Director Valentina Peleggi.

Local sponsors of the Menuhin include the Richmond Symphony, the University of Richmond, Virginia Commonwealth University, the City of Richmond and VPM (Virginia Public Media).

Richmond Symphony 2021-22

The Richmond Symphony’s 2021-22 Masterworks concerts will juxtapose repertory staples by Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Brahms, Dvořák, Rachmaninoff and Shostakovich with works by women and composers of color, including the Piano Concerto in one movement by Florence Beatrice Price and “Umoja, Anthem of Unity” by Valerie Coleman.

The season also will mark the 50th anniversary of the Richmond Symphony Chorus with performances of Haydn’s oratorio “The Creation” and Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony in spring 2022.

The orchestra will present eight Masterworks programs on Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons – six conducted by Music Director Valentina Peleggi, one each by Chia-Hsuan Lin, the symphony’s associate conductor, and Erin Freeman, director of the Symphony Chorus – at the Carpenter Theatre of Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets in downtown Richmond.

Guest instrumental soloists in the coming season include pianists Louis Schwizgebel in the Price concerto and George Li in Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, violinist Stefan Jackiw in Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s Violin Concerto in D major, and cellist Sterling Elliott, the Newport News-born winner of the 2014 Richmond Symphony Concerto Competition, in Haydn’s Cello Concerto No. 2 in D major. Daisuke Yamamoto, the symphony’s concertmaster, will be the solo violinist in Bruch’s “Scottish Fantasy.”

In addition to Coleman’s “Umoja,” works by contemporary composers include “Overdrive” by Melissa Dunphy, “Alma’s Songs with Words” by Roxanna Panufnik and “An Act of Resistance” (second reading) by Joel Thompson.

“A Baroque Holiday,” a Christmas concert whose conductor and program will be announced later, is scheduled for Dec. 4 at the Carpenter Theatre. Tickets are $20-$60.

Past subscribers to the Masterworks series are receiving renewal forms by mail. For information on new subscriptions and single-ticket availability, call the symphony’s patron services office at (804) 788-1212, ext. 2 or visit http://richmondsymphony.com

Additional symphony series and special concerts will be announced later, as will plans to continue online streams of concerts for home viewing and listening early in the coming season.

The 2021-22 Masterworks season:

Sept. 25 (8 p.m.)
Sept. 26 (3 p.m.)
Valentina Peleggi conducting
Florence Beatrice Price: Piano Concerto in one movement
Louis Schwizgebel, piano
Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 in E minor (“From the New World”)
other works TBA

Oct. 23 (8 p.m.)
Oct. 24 (3 p.m.)
Chia-Hsuan Lin conducting
Melissa Dunphy: “Overdrive”
Haydn: Cello Concerto No. 2 in D major

Sterling Elliott, cello
Stravinsky: “Pulcinella” Suite
Prokofiev: Symphony No. 1 in D major (“Classical”)

Nov. 13 (8 p.m.)
Nov. 14 (3 p.m.)
Valentina Peleggi conducting
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor
other works TBA

Jan. 29 (8 p.m.)
Jan. 30 (3 p.m.)
Valentina Peleggi conducting
Roxanna Panufnik: “Alma’s Songs without Words”
Erich Wolfgang Korngold: Violin Concerto in D major

Stefan Jackiw, violin
Brahms: Symphony No. 1 in C minor

Feb. 26 (8 p.m.)
Feb. 27 (3 p.m.)
Valentina Peleggi conducting
Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor
George Li, piano
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5 in D minor

March 19 (8 p.m.)
March 20 (3 p.m.)
Valentina Peleggi conducting
Bruch: “Scottish Fantasy”
Daisuke Yamamoto, violin
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3 in A minor (“Scottish”)
other works TBA

April 9 (8 p.m.)
April 10 (3 p.m.)
Erin Freeman conducting
Haydn: “The Creation”
soloists TBA
Richmond Symphony Chorus

May 21 (8 p.m.)
May 22 (3 p.m.)
Valentina Peleggi conducting
Valerie Coleman: “Umoja, Anthem for Unity”
Joel Thompson: “An Act of Resistance” (second reading)
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor (“Choral”)

April Martin, soprano
Stephanie Foley Davis, mezzo-soprano
Rodrick Dixon, tenor
Damien Geter, bass-baritone
Richmond Symphony Chorus

Special concert:

Dec. 4 (7:30 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Energy Center
conductor TBA
“A Baroque Holiday”
program TBA

May calendar

Richmond rounds of the Yehudi Menuhin International Violin Competition for young musicians, delayed for a year because of the pandemic, are under way, with most of the competition being conducted online.

In one live-only event, the Richmond Symphony, with guest conductor Jahja Ling and violinist Angelo Xiang Yu, a winner in the 2010 competition, will perform in a Celebration Concert, whose program includes Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216, and “The Marriage of Figaro” Overture; Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 in A major; “Bound Away,” a piece for violin written for the competition by Richmond-bred Mason Bates; and “Starburst” by Jessie Montgomery, at 7 p.m. May 14 and 8 p.m. May 15 at the Carpenter Theatre of Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets. Tickets: $10-$100 (seating limited). Details: (800) 514-3849 (ETIX); http://www.richmondsymphony.com

Other events in the Menuhin Competition, including concerts by the Regina Carter Quartet, Mark & Maggie O’Connor, members of the Sphinx Virtuosi chamber orchestra, past winners of the competition and the Richmond Symphony with violinist Angelo Xiang Yu and winners of this year’s competition, can be accessed without charge. Schedule details: https://letterv.blog/2021/04/25/mostly-virtual-menuhin-competition-beginning-in-richmond-this-week/

For more information on the Menuhin Competition, running through May 23, visit its website: http://2021.menuhincompetition.org

Members of the Richmond Symphony play chamber works in Coffee Break Concerts, 11:30 a.m. May 7 and 21 at Ironclad Coffee Roasters, 1805 E. Grace St. Admission is free. Details: (804) 788-1212; http://richmondsymphony.com

Virginia Opera and the Richmond Symphony, Adam Turner conducting, stage Leonard Bernstein’s one-act opera “Trouble in Tahiti” at 4 p.m. May 1 at Dogwood Dell, Byrd Park, in Richmond. The cast includes Marissa Simmons as Dinah, Eric McConnell as Sam and Symone Harcum, Andrew Turner and Nicholas Martorano as the boys-and-girl trio. Kyle Lang is the stage director. Admission is free; reservations are required. Details: (804) 644-8168; http://vaopera.org . . . The production moves to Norfolk for performances with the Virginia Symphony Orchestra, presented in conjunction with the Virginia Arts Festival, at 6 and 8:30 p.m. May 7 and 4 and 7 p.m. May 8 at the VAF Bank Street Stage, 440 Bank St. Tickets: $35-$140. Details: (866) 673-7282; http://vaopera.org

The Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia, in partnership with the Richmond Public Library’s Gellman Room series, presents flutist Mary Boodell, violinist Jesse Mills, pianists Rieko Aizawa and Ingrid Keller, writer Angela Lehman and host James Wilson performing from their homes in Richmond and New York in “A Musical Aviary,” a free program of works by Saint-Saëns, Somei Satoh, Howard Swanson and Jean Sichler in an online stream at 2 p.m. May 1. Access: http://rvalibrary.org/events/gellman-concerts . . . The society also presents clarinetist David Lemelin, violinists Meredith Riley and Christopher Whitley, violist Fritz Gary and cellist Khari Joyner in live performances of Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet in A major, K. 581; Carlos Simon’s “An Elegy: Cry from the Grave;” and a quartet arrangement of Bartók’s “Romanian Folk Dances” at 4 p.m. May 2 at Trinity Lutheran Church, 2315 N. Parham Road. Tickets: $5-$30. Details: (804) 304-6312; http://cmscva.org

Benjamin Rous conducts the Virginia Symphony Orchestra in John Adams’ “Shaker Loops” and Mozart’s Symphony No. 36 in C major, K. 425 (“Linz”) at 2:30 p.m. May 2 at the Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St. in Virginia Beach. Tickets: $35. . . . Gerard Schwarz conducts the VSO, with soprano Aundi Maria Moore, in a Virginia Arts Festival-sponsored, all-American program of works TBA by Copland, Barber and Still at 7:30 p.m. May 14 at Christopher Newport University’s Ferguson Arts Center in Newport News and 7:30 p.m. May 15 at Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, in Norfolk. Tickets: $35-$55. Details: (757) 892-6366; http://virginiasymphony.org

Other Virginia Arts Festival classical events: The Brentano String Quartet in an evening concert at 7:30 p.m. May 10 at the VAF Bank Street stage, 440 Bank St. in Norfolk (tickets: $35-$140), and a morning concert at 10:30 a.m. May 11 at Sandler Arts Center in Virginia Beach (tickets: $15-$20). . . . A May 13 recital by classical guitarist Manuel Barrueco is sold out. . . Pianist Olga Kern, violinist Lara St. John and cellist Amanda Forsyth perform at 7:30 p.m. May 25 at VAF Bank Street Stage in Norfolk (tickets: $35-$140), and in a morning concert at 10:30 a.m. May 26 at Sandler Arts Center in Virginia Beach (tickets: $15-$20). Programs TBA. Details: (757) 282-2822; http://vafest.org

Other ensembles in Virginia and the Washington area are presenting series of streamed and archived programs. Check the websites of organizations and presenters for details and access procedures.

Mostly virtual Menuhin Competition beginning in Richmond this week

The Yehudi Menuhin International Competition for young violinists, delayed since last spring and now staged mostly virtually due to the pandemic, will begin in Richmond in the coming week. With the exception of the competition’s Celebration Concert program, all competition rounds and concerts may be accessed online at no charge.

The Celebration Concert, with the Richmond Symphony conducted by Jahja Ling, will feature violinist Angelo Xiang Yu, winner of the senior first prize in the 2010 competition in Oslo and a juror in this year’s competition, playing Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216, and the premiere of “Bound Away” by Richmond-bred composer Mason Bates. The program also includes Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro” Overture, Jessie Montgomery’s “Starburst” and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 in A major. Performances are at 7 p.m. May 14 and 8 p.m. May 15 at the Carpenter Theatre of Dominion Energy Center, Sixth and Grace streets. Ticket and online access prices will be announced later.

The schedule of free events, accessible via http://2021.menuhincompetition.org and on the competition’s YouTube channel:

April 26 (10 a.m.-2 p.m.) – Junior rounds, day 1.
April 27 (10 a.m.-2 p.m.) – Junior rounds, day 2.
April 28 (10 a.m.-2 p.m.) – Senior rounds, day 1.
April 29 (10 a.m.-2 p.m.) – Senior rounds, day 2.
May 15 (10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) – Junior semi-finals.
May 16 (10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) – Senior semi-finals.
May 17 (7:30 p.m.) – Jazz concert by the Regina Carter Quartet.
May 18 (7:30 p.m.) – Geneva junior prizewinners’ concert, with violinists Chloe Chua and Christian Li and pianists Laurence Matheson and Lim Yan. Program TBA.
May 19 (7:30 p.m.) – Folk-acoustic concert by Mark & Maggie O’Connor.
May 20 (10 a.m.-6 p.m.) – Jury masterclasses, conducted by violinist Pamela Frank with physical therapist Howard Nelson; violinists Joji Hattori, Noah Bendix-Balgley, Alf Richard Kraggerud, Soyoung Yoon and Angelo Xiang Yu; and conductor Valentina Peleggi.
May 20 (7:30 p.m.) – Sphinx Virtuosi Showcase, with violinists Rubén Rengel, Rainel Joubert and Melissa White, violist Celia Hatton, cellist Thomas Mesa and double-bassist Xavier Foley playing works by Dvořák, Piazzolla, Foley, Andrea Casarrubios and Michael Abels.
May 21 (3:30 p.m.) – “The Danger of a Single Story: the Importance of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in the Arts and Their Role in Society,” panel discussion with Aaron Dworkin, Ronald Crutcher and others.
May 21 (7:30-9:30 p.m.) – Junior finals.
May 22 (7:30-10 p.m.) – Senior finals.
May 23 (5 p.m.) – Menuhin Competition Gala, with the Richmond Symphony, conductor TBA; violinist Angelo Xiang Yu; junior & senior competition winners; and guest artists TBA. Program TBA. (Televised on VPM PBS [Channel 23] and streamed on the competition’s website, http://2021.menuhincompetition.org

Local sponsors of the 2021 Menuhin Competition are the Richmond Symphony, the City of Richmond, the University of Richmond, Virginia Commonwealth University and VPM.

Christa Ludwig (1928-2021)

Christa Ludwig, the eminent German mezzo-soprano, has died at 93.

Ludwig, the daughter of musical-theater figures, began her career in post-World War II Germany, singing for US occupation troops and in small recital venues. She made her operatic debut at 18, singing the role of Orlovsky in Johann Strauss II’s “Die Fledermaus” at the Frankfurt Opera in 1946. After working in several German opera houses, she was hired in 1955 to perform at the Vienna State Opera.

She went on to perform mezzo and some soprano roles with many of the world’s leading companies; for decades she was a favorite singer at New York’s Metropolitan Opera. She also was a celebrated interpreter of art-song and oratorio, and made many recordings that became reference versions of works by Schubert, Wagner, Mahler and Richard Strauss.

Her final stage performance was as Klytemnestra in a 1994 Vienna State Opera production of Strauss’ “Elektra.”

An obituary by The New York Times’ Daniel J. Wakin:

Virginia Opera 2021-22

Virginia Opera’s coming season will feature two favorite works, Puccini’s “La Bohème” and Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro,” as well as the Virginia premiere of “Three Decembers” by the contemporary American composer Jake Heggie, a condensed version of Wagner’s “Das Rheingold” and a production of the Rodgers & Hammerstein musical “The Sound of Music,” staged during the Virginia Arts Festival.

Based on “Some Christmas Letters,” an unpublished play by Terrence McNally, Heggie’s “Three Decembers” follows the relationship and unfolding secrets of a fading Broadway star and her children through the holidays of 1986, 1996 and 2006.

“Das Rheingold,” first of the four music dramas in Wagner’s “Ring” cycle, will be presented in a condensation by Jonathan Dove.

The 2021-22 Virginia Opera schedule:

“Das Rheingold” (sung in German with English captions) – pairs of afternoon and evening performances on Sept. 12 at TopGolf Norfolk and Sept. 19 at TopGolf Richmond. (Seating is limited and currently available to subscribers only.)

“La Bohème” (sung in Italian with English captions) –Nov. 5, 6 and 7 at Harrison Opera House in Norfolk, Nov. 13 and 14 at George Mason University’s Center for the Arts in Fairfax, and Nov. 19 and 21 at the Carpenter Theatre of Dominion Energy Center in Richmond.

“Three Decembers” (sung in English with captions) –Jan. 28, 29 and 30 in Norfolk, Feb. 5 and 6 in Fairfax, and Feb. 11 and 13 in Richmond.

“The Marriage of Figaro” (sung in Italian with English captions) –March 25, 26 and 27 in Norfolk, April 1 and 3 in Richmond, and April 9 and 10 in Fairfax.

“The Sound of Music” (in English) –May 13, 14 and 15 at the Harrison Opera House in Norfolk.

Casting will be announced later.

For subscription-ticket prices and other information, call Virginia Opera’s box office at (866) 673-7282, or visit http://vaopera.org

Youth competition winners

The Richmond Symphony Youth Orchestra Program has announced the winners of its 2021 Digital Competition.

Among Camerata Strings competitors, violinist Isaac Wilson was in first place, violinist Aidyn Ellis-Otovo was in second place, and violinist Thomas Do received honorable mention.

In the Youth Concert Orchestra running, flutist Erin Clark won first place.

Richmond Symphony Youth Orchestra winners include violinist Lira Masuda and flutist Camille Ryder, tied for first place; violinist Victoria Duell, second place; harpist Adelaide Gill, third place; violinist Marianna Wolpert, honorable mention; and clarinetist Benjamin Eubanks, most improved player.