Letter V Classical Radio Aug. 28

Previewing the 2019-20 classical season in Richmond, with performances by artists who will be featured in concerts of the Richmond Symphony, chamber programs of the University of Richmond’s Modlin Arts Center and Virginia Commonwealth University’s Rennolds Chamber Concerts, and next spring’s Richmond rounds of the Menuhin International Violin Competition.

noon-3 p.m. EDT
1700-2000 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
http://wdce.net

Dvořák: “Scherzo capriccioso”
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra/Marin Alsop
(Naxos)

Mozart: Quartet in B flat major, K. 589 (“Prussian”)
Dover Quartet
(Çedille)

Hindemith: Sonata, Op. 31, No. 2, for solo violin (“Es ist so schönes Wetter draussen”)
Ning Feng, violin
(Channel Classics)

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor
Yefim Bronfman, piano
Tonhalle Orchestra, Zurich/David Zinman
(Arte Nova)

Nielsen: Clarinet Concerto
Anthony McGill, clarinet
New York Philharmonic/Alan Gilbert
(Dacapo)

Martinů: “Variations on a Slovak Folksong”
Matt Haimovitz, cello
Christopher O’Riley, piano
(Pentatone Oxingale)

Liszt: “Valse-impromptu”
Jon Nakamatsu, piano
(Harmonia Mundi)

Prokofiev: “Pushkin Waltzes,” Op. 120
National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine/Theodore Kuchar
(Naxos)

Bruch: Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor
Daniel Hope, violin
Royal Stockholm Philharmonic/Sakari Oramo
(Deutsche Grammophon)

Jessie Montgomery: “Strum”
Catalyst Quartet
(Azica)

Review: Richmond Chamber Players

Aug. 25, Bon Air Presbyterian Church

The best music for piano and string quartet strikes an ideal balance between intimacy and scale. It’s compact enough to be heard up close and in detail, but populated enough to accommodate the layers of sound and color, the complexity of voicings, found in orchestral music.

Among the best-known piano quintets, Brahms’ F minor, Op. 34, and Franck’s have their great attributes and many admirers, but Dvořák’s A major, Op. 81, is both great and lovable. It earns almost universal affection because it shows off the composer’s gift for creating memorable tunes and exploiting infectious folk-dance rhythms as well as any work he ever wrote.

The Richmond Chamber Players closed out their Interlude 2019 series with the Dvořák quintet in a performance that started out raw and loud but happily developed more lyricism and lilt as it progressed.

Pianist John Walter, violinists Catherine Cary and Susanna Klein, violist Stephen Schmidt and cellist Neal Cary (Klein substituting on late notice for Susy Yim, out with an injured finger) treated Dvořák’s melodies with warmth and phrasing that was expansive but not quite indulgently so. The cellist and violist were especially adept at achieving that balance. Walter was the ensemble’s rhythmic driver, a most effective one once he moderated the high volume projected in the opening movement.

A similar apportionment of energies and voicings, on a smaller scale, came through in a performance of Beethoven’s Sonata in C major, Op. 102, No. 1, for piano and cello, played by pianist Daniel Stipe and cellist Emma Cary.

Cary, daughter of the violinist and cellist, giving a last local performance before heading off to college, played her part with warm, rich tone when the cello is the leading voice and acute attention to rhythmic detail when the instrument is accompanying the piano or seconding its musical gestures. Stipe was both a supportive partner and an assertive but not over-dominant leader in this reading.

Between the Beethoven and Dvořák, oboist David Garcia, clarinetist David Lemelin and bassoonist Thomas Schneider played the Trio for their instruments by the short-lived, Czech-born composer Vítězslava Kaprálová. (It’s more accurate to say the piece was conceived and begun by Kaprálová; this finished product was assembled from a partial score, sketches and material from other works by the oboist Stéphane Egeling in 2011, more than 50 years after Kaprálová’s death.)

Kaprálová began her trio in the late 1930s, when she had settled in France, and the piece belongs to the large body of modern French literature for wind ensemble, nearly all of it in the neoclassical style pioneered by Stravinsky, with an overlay of cheeky Parisian urbanity. That was the stance adopted winningly by Garcia, Lemelin and Schneider.

Letter V Classical Radio Aug. 21

Wrapping up the show’s summer season highlighting two live performances: the just-released recording of Mason Bates’ “Children of Adam,” introduced last year by the Richmond Symphony and Symphony Chorus, Steven Smith conducting; and a remarkable rendition of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, led by Charles Mackerras, from the 1994 Edinburgh Festival.

noon-3 p.m. EDT
1700-2000 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
http://wdce.net

Milhaud: “La création du monde”
Contemporary Chamber Ensemble/Arthur Weisberg
(Nonesuch)

Mason Bates: “Children of Adam”
Richmond Symphony Chorus
Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith
(Reference Recordings)

Ben Johnston: Quartet No. 4 (“Amazing Grace”)
Kepler Quartet
(New World)

Haydn: Symphony No. 60 in C major (“Per la Commedia intitulata Il Distratto”)
Combattimento Consort Amsterdam/Jan Willem de Vriend
(Etcetera)

Mendelssohn: Prelude and Fugue in E minor, Op. 35, No. 1
Benjamin Grosvenor, piano
(Decca)

J.S. Bach: Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, BWV 582
(orchestration by Ottorino Respighi)
Seattle Symphony/Gerard Schwarz
(Naxos)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor (“Choral”)
Amanda Roocroft, soprano
Fiona Janes, mezzo-soprano
John Mark Ainsley, tenor
Neal Davies, bass
The New Company
Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment/Charles Mackerras
(Signum Classics)

Domingo accused of sexual harassment

Plácido Domingo, the veteran tenor-turned-baritone, opera company director and conductor, has been accused of sexual harassment by nine female performers. The allegations, dating to the 1980s and ’90s, were aired in an Associated Press report:

http://www.apnews.com/c2d51d690d004992b8cfba3bad827ae9

The accusations were rebuffed by Domingo as “deeply troubling, and as presented, inaccurate.” He said in a statement that “all of my interactions and relationships were always welcomed and consensual.”

Among the eight singers and one dancer telling the AP that Domingo made unwanted advances, one, mezzo-soprano Patricia Wulf, spoke on the record, saying that Domingo propositioned her during a 1998 run of Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” at the Washington Opera (now Washington National Opera) when he was the company’s general director.

The Los Angeles Opera, where the 78-year-old Domingo currently serves as artistic director, has opened an investigation of the allegations, and several other arts organizations, including the Metropolitan Opera, have either canceled his appearances or put them on hold pending the outcome of the probe, Michael Cooper and Alex Marshall report in The New York Times:

Review: Richmond Chamber Players

Aug. 11, Bon Air Presbyterian Church

“And now, for something completely different.” The old Monty Python catchphrase came to life as members of the Richmond Chamber Players turned from Florence Price’s reworkings of American folk tunes to Sergei Prokofiev’s Violin Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 80, and then to the ragtime revival of William Bolcom.

The highlight of the concert was the Prokofiev, played by violinist Susy Yim and pianist Daniel Stipe. The sonata, written for the great Russian violinist David Oistrakh (teacher of Yim’s teacher) and introduced in 1946, is one of Prokofiev’s darkest and most starkly expressive works, and one of the most vivid sound artifacts of the psychic trauma inflicted on Russians during the murderous dictatorship of Joseph Stalin and the ravages of the Second World War.

Yim’s devotion to the sonata was audible in a concentrated and highly charged performance that conveyed both the chill of a recurring theme, which Prokofiev likened to “wind passing through a graveyard,” and the lyricism of several sections that recall romantic episodes of the composer’s “Romeo and Juliet” ballet music. The violinist gave full vent to the violence of the sonata’s second movement, marked allegro brusco, which sounds as if the Montagues and Capulets of “Romeo and Juliet” battle anew with high explosives.

Like Beethoven’s sonatas for piano and stringed instruments, Prokofiev’s Op. 80 is apportioned equally for the two instruments. Stipe, playing his third concert in five days, was very much Yim’s match in sound projection and expressive potency.

A string quartet composed Yim, violinist Catherine Cary, violist Stephen Schmidt and cellist Neal Cary opened the program with “Five Folksongs in Counterpoint” by Florence Price, an African-American female composer active in the middle third of the 20th century, whose music was celebrated in her prime years, neglected for decades after her death in 1953, and recently has been enjoying a revival.

Price’s elaborations on familiar tunes – “Calvary,” “My Darling Clementine,” “Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes,” “Shortnin’ Bread” and “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” – are late-romantic in style and at times veer close to didactic exercises in theme and variation; but she chose good material, treated it affectionately, and gave the four instruments many opportunities for intricate interplay. This performance brought out the most attractive qualities of the settings.

Bolcom, a veteran American composer, was one of the prime movers in the ragtime revival of the 1960s and ’70s, both as a performer of classics by Scott Joplin and other masters of the piano rag around the turn of the 20th century, and as a composer of new rags echoing the old style. Bolcom’s “Graceful Ghost” (1970), probably the most widely performed latter-day piano rag, is recast as the central piece in his “Three Rags for String Quartet (Ghost Rags),” dating from 1989.

The set, nicely balancing whimsical expressiveness and played-for-chuckles spooky touches, was given a brightly animated reading by this string ensemble.

The Richmond Chamber Players’ Interlude series continues with music of Brahms, Allan Blank and Chen Yi at 3 p.m. Aug. 18 at Bon Air Presbyterian Church, 9201 W. Huguenot Road. Tickets: $25 Details: http://www.richmondchamberplayers.org

Letter V Classical Radio Aug. 14

To tame the dog days, a program of chamber music.

noon-3 p.m. EDT
1700-2000 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
http://wdce.net

Schubert: Quartet in C minor, D. 703 (“Quartettsatz”)
Miró Quartet
(Longhorn Music)

Amy Beach: Theme and Variations, Op. 80
Eugenia Zukerman, flute
Shanghai Quartet
(Delos)

Borodin: Piano Quintet in C minor, Op. posth.
Alexander Mogilevsky, piano
Andrey Baranov & Géza Hosszu-Legocky, violins
Nora Romanoff, viola
Jing Zhao, cello
(Warner Classics)

Mendelssohn: Octet in E flat major, Op. 20
James Ehnes, Erin Keefe, Andrew Wan & Augustin Hadelich, violins
Cynthia Phelps & Richard O’Neill, violas
Robert deMaine & Edward Arron, cellos
(Onyx)

Beethoven: Cello Sonata in A major, Op. 69
Pieter Wispelwey, cello
Dejan Lazić, piano
(Channel Classics)

Caroline Shaw: “Blueprint”
Aizuri Quartet
(New Amsterdam)

Past Masters:
Brahms: Piano Trio No. 1 in B major, Op. 8
Arthur Rubinstein, piano
Henryk Szeryng, violin
Pierre Fournier, cello
(RCA Red Seal)
(recorded 1972)

Bartók: “Contrasts”
Chantal Julliet, violin
Michael Collins, clarinet
Martha Argerich, piano
(Warner Classics)